Discussion Board

Topic: A sort of terminus

From: patrick
Location:
Date: 07/17/2009

Though I'm reading CITY right now, that below wasn't directly influenced by, isn't directly related to, it. I thought you might be interested, though. Post it as you will, open for discussion if you wish.



synopsis: rather than complex, humans are complicated.


Order: there is always order. (An even distribution may be the most ordered something can be.) For example in painting, without the boundary conditions that are color, hue, shading, etc, there is no way - one might say no opportunity - to express one's self, and those like Jackson Pollock (and in music Schoenberg, and particularly Stockhausen) understood and explored this to be able to express themselves in the ways they needed.

utility/balance: emotional capacity is useful. It's largely how we experience the world. It's inherently problematic, though, because humans naturally assume some sort of moral connotation (often simply, 'I like this so it must be good') is related to the their feeling. The experience isn't neutral. It isn't clean. It would follow that dispelling this tendency to 'self-associate' is a desirable thing.

ego: to me, it is the lack of: a fundamental curiosity that guides one's identity, independent of culture, and even gender.

authority: Humans inherently look to culture as an authority on what is proper, desirable, adequate. Even more so in the last century with pop culture. When I was a kid I too assumed pop culture was an authority, though moral elements generally discouraged me. When I was in college, I realised it is very subjective and contrained. As I got older, I realised that, while it is useful and fun, all of human culture is subjective and constrained. The logical step would be - not erase or obviate it, but - to transcend it.

People in general appear incapable of comprehending, or even being aware of, these things. If there is any free will (and I'm not a proponent of it, mind), then people are generally stupid, or they're insecure and are purposefully refusing them (except that either condition would be a determining factor - hmhmhm).

Re: A sort of terminus

From: Greg Bear
Date: 07/28/2009

Interesting. What's the baseline of desirable action, however? Humans behave like biological systems in general. How could we improve upon this by purely analytical, intellectual effort?

Re: A sort of terminus

From: patrick
Location:
Date: 07/28/2009

MM. Desirable action is 'lack of ego'. 'Improvement' is in an analog of biological systems: I realise (not just conceive and comprehend, but embody) something, I express/signify it, it is received/infused and continually transmitted.


By the way, here is a mature version of the above. (I posted a little pre-emptively that day.) Not remarkably different, but some additions, subtractions, and cleaner in approach.


offering : to aspire to and discover the least restricted mode of function and interaction.


Order: there is always order. (An even distribution may be the most ordered something can be.) For example in painting, without the boundary conditions that are color, hue, shading, etc, there is no way - one might say no opportunity - to express one's self, and those like Jackson Pollock (and in music Schoenberg, and particularly Stockhausen) understood and explored this to be able to express themselves in the ways they needed.

utility/balance: emotional capacity is useful. It's largely how we experience the world. It's inherently problematic, though, because humans naturally assume some sort of moral connotation (often simply, 'I like this so it must be good') in relation their feeling and their experience. The experience isn't neutral. It isn't clean. It would follow that dispelling this tendency to 'self-associate' is a desirable thing.

ego: to me, it is the lack of: a fundamental curiosity that guides one's identity, independent of culture, and even gender.

authority: Humans inherently look to culture as an authority on what is proper, desirable, adequate. Even more so in the last century with pop culture. Despite popular opinion, pop culture, in it's sway to fancy and fashion, is very subjective and contrained. In fact, in its inherent moral imperative, all of human culture is subjective and constrained. The logical step would be - not erase or obviate it, but - to transcend it. That is, to simply no longer have the need for it.

People in general appear incapable of comprehending, or even being aware of, these things. If there is any free will, then people are generally stupid, or they're insecure and are purposefully refusing them (except that either condition would be a determining factor - hmhmhm).

Of course, all the above can be expressed in the phrase: emotionally vibrant yet unattached

Respond to this discussion

May we post your correspondence on this site?
Yes
No
IMPORTANT: For form verification, type the following number in the box below: 75




See Also...

Archives: [Oct-Dec 2004] [Jan-June 2005] [July-Dec 2005] [Jan-June 2006] [July 2006] [Aug-Dec 2006] [2007] [2008] [2009] [2010] [2011] [2012] [2013] [2014] [Current] [Search Blog Archives]