Greg Bear Discussion Board Archives

Home Page | Archive Menu

January - June 2012

Dinosaur Summer

Date: 06/27/2012 From: Brian Fitzsimons
Location: Manhasset NY

I love Dinosaur Summer. Its one of my favorite dinosaurs books of all time. I just have 2 questions about the book.

1. What inspired you to write Dinosaur Summer?
2. Which dinosaur predator in your opinion is more deadly, the Stratoraptor or the Death Eagle?

 

Re: Dinosaur Summer
Date: 08/25/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Brian! DINOSAUR SUMMER comes out of my love of all things saurian, and probably began with KING KONG and Harryhausen movies. As for who is more deadly, I wouldn't want to be caught in a canyon with either, especially if they were fighting!
 

Re: Dinosaur Summer
Date: 10/29/2012
From: Brian Fitzsimons
Location: Manhasset NY

Dinosaur Summer is an excellent sequel to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's novel The Lost World. What i like about this sequel is the Dinosaurs and learning that the novel by Sir Arthur COnan Doyle is real. Dinosaurs such as the Stratoraptor and the Death Eagle which to me sounds like between the two are predatory kings of Maple White Land. Then going back to Maple White Land learning that Professor Challenger was right about the existence of Maple White Land. Overall, great sequel to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's novel The Lost World.
 

Re: Dinosaur Summer
Date: 10/31/2012
From: Greg Bear

Many thanks, Brian! Here's to dinosaurs with feathers and both beaks AND teeth!
 

Re: Dinosaur Summer
Date: 01/13/2013
From: Brian Fitzsimons
Location: Manhasset, NY

I would love to see Dinosaur Summer to be made into a movie. After reading Dinosaur Summer many times, i say to myself what a great movie Dinosaur Summer would be. I can't believe Hollywood hasn't done a movie of Dinosaur Summer. I'm also waiting for Hollywood to Remake The Lost World 1925 Silent Film with today's special effects which would be awesome and I'm also waiting for Hollywood to Remake The Land That Time Forgot and turning it into a trilogy which includes The Land That Time Forgot, The People That Time Forgot, and Out of Time's Abyss. Anyway, I hope i hear news that Hollywood will make a movie of Dinosaur Summer.
 

Re: Dinosaur Summer
Date: 02/03/2013
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Brian! It would be fun to see our old favorites done right and proper. Burroughs was given a very good turn in JOHN CARTER, but it may be a while before we see his other novels on screen.
 

Re: Dinosaur Summer
Date: 05/02/2013
From: Brian Fitzsimons
Location: Manhasset, NY

Dinosaur Summer is one of my favorite dinosaur books of all time and is an excellent sequel to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Novel The Lost World. I just have 4 questions.

1. Why do you believe that Evolution didn't stop on Maple White Land?
2. How is your version of Maple White Land compared to Doyle's Maple White Land?
3. Why is there no mention of Professor Challenger in your sequel?
4. What is your Favorite Dinosaur in Dinosaur Summer?
 

Re: Dinosaur Summer
Date: 05/02/2013
From: Greg Bear

Answers--
1. Because evolution hardly ever stops anywhere...
2. Similar in geology, but more varied in life forms.
3. Our narrator goes to Challenger High School, as I recall.
4. Have to say I have a preference for Stratoraptor!

Damn

Date: 06/25/2012 From: Scott Maslowe
Location: West Bloomfield, Michigan

Greg Bear,

I read all your work just like everyone else who likes realistic science fiction. I have no questions or anything significant to say. I just wanted to say thank you for the years of such consistently damn, damn, damn, good stories.
 

Re: Damn
Date: 08/25/2012
From: Greg Bear

Damn good to hear from you! Thanks for writing, Scott.
 

Re: Damn
Date: 09/30/2012
From: Scott Maslowe
Location: West Bloomfield, Michigan

Damn welcome!

Moving Blood Music

Date: 06/23/2012 From: Bill Goodwin
Location: Los Angeles, CA


Snowflakes on Mars are smaller than their Earth counterparts, having roughly the same diameter as a human red blood cell, a new study reports.

http://news.yahoo.com/mars-snowflakes-tiny-red-blood-cells-162342554.html
 

Re: Moving Blood Music
Date: 08/25/2012
From: Greg Bear

Winter at Bradbury Landing should be lovely, no?
 

Re: Moving Blood Music
Date: 08/25/2012
From: Bill Goodwin
Location: Los Angeles, CA

I hear it's sublime!

How do companies like 343 hire writers to write novels.

Date: 06/22/2012 From: David
Location: British Columbia

Is it all 343 pulling the strings or is it Microsoft because that would probably be my dream Job to write for Halo or Star wars I am not a professional writer but just a fan. I truly considered writing as a career but I saw it as a little risky, I am regretting it now as I enjoyed it very much.

- Thank you for your time.
 

Re: How do companies like 343 hire writers to write novels.
Date: 08/25/2012
From: Greg Bear

Microsoft and Tor choose who writes the novels, and we all collaborate to bring them in line with game expectations. By all means, keep writing your own stories!

Little details in your books

Date: 06/21/2012 From: Matthew Vartanian
Location: Somewhere outside portland Oregon

Mr Bear, thank you for creating the worlds I read about in your books. Your books are sandwiched between Asimov and Clarke and deserve their place. Parts of your writing are based on experiences you've had. And things I pick up in your books are based on experiences I've had in my life. As an Armenian Oregonian I see recurring mention of my state of residence, and more interestingly, my nationality. I suspect if I weren't Armenian I would never have noticed. I'm just curious if you were aware of the casual Armenian references and what experience(s) you have had (with Armenians) that has prompted their inclusion in your books... Then again if I were Hawaiian or Polish I may have noticed inclusion of those nationalities. If you think it's the case that I'm just overly sensitive because of my somewhat obscure nationality, that's a valid answer too.

Matt Vartanian
 

Re: Little details in your books
Date: 10/17/2012
From: Greg Bear

Hmmm... remind me of specifics, Matthew! My mother's side of the family lived and worked in the Salinas Valley back in the thirties... right alongside Saroyan's neighborhoods. And Steinbeck's! So maybe that explains any spiritual connection!

Halo Primordium; the Flood; and Blood Music

Date: 06/19/2012 From: Jake Gonzales
Location: Perth, Western Australia

Hey Greg,

I've just finished reading the second in your Forerunner trilogy. I'm a long time Halo fan and also a huge fan of your book Blood Music. I couldn't help but draw similarities between the the Flood's ultimate goal of unifying all organisms and the assimilation of organisms by the noocytes. Both forms apparently leading to an intellectual gestalt.

I internally felt quite happy to imagine that these two forms were perhaps the same entity and within the same universe; making both texts seem far more exciting.

Did you draw from your ideas or feel a certain connection to your previous work when you were learning and writing about the flood?

Your concepts for higher levels of thought inspire me endlessly. Thankyou for all that you have written.

Jake
 

Re: Halo Primordium; the Flood; and Blood Music
Date: 08/26/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Jake!

There are similarities, which I'm having fun with. But we have to look back at past "assimilators" in SF, including THE BLOB and Thomas and Wilhelm's THE CLONE--one of my favorites on the topic.

"Prometheus" similarities to "Hull Zero-Three"

Date: 06/18/2012 From: Jon Allen
Location: Saint Paul, MN

Hi Greg, great job on "Hull Zero-Three", which I am looking forward to re-reading.

SPOILERS

I was wondering if you'd had a chance to see "Prometheus" yet. It had a few (coincidental) resonances with "Hull Zero-Three", particularly the idea of interstellar travelers with formidable genetic engineering skills capable of creating life, both wonderful and horrible. In the movie, these capabilities are perceived by the characters as being not much more than icky weapons of mass destruction - anthrax and VX with teeth and slime, but with your novel in the back of my mind the concept seemed more perhaps even more sinister than the filmmakers intended.

Or, perhaps, Ridley Scott was finally demonstrating why what in its individual iterations could easily be killed with flamethrowers and firearms is so dangerous and so appealing to the powers that be.

Anyhow, thanks for the decades of great stuff, and best wishes.

Jon Allen
 

Re:
Date: 08/25/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Jon! I have not yet seen PROMETHEUS but will doubtless revel in the Blu-Ray disc.

Forerunner culture is intriguing.

Date: 06/15/2012 From: Siddhartha Srinivasa
Location: Chennai, India

Wow Mr.Bear , I really love the way your taking Halo history forward. I mean, coming from a previously caste based society (based on occupations) myself, its is a wonder to see how it would be on a galactic scale. And you've perfectly detailed how such divisions would lead to caste domination. It still happens that way in India.

By the way, I have read only Halo: Cryptum and I really loved it. And I am struggling to find a copy of Primordium but I'll get it soon. What i like most about your novels is how they go into the intricacies of the technology. And i would really like to know more about Synchrons and Geas. And
Slipspace, hopefully.

Lots of hopes for Silentium, Greg.
 

Re: Forerunner culture is intriguing.
Date: 10/17/2012
From: Greg Bear

Coming soon--March is the current pub date! And lots of speculative tech and physics to keep us all happy. Looking forward to your reaction!

Looking forward

Date: 06/14/2012 From: Kenny Brown
Location: Victoria, TX

Mr. Bear,

Just wanted to write/type to say thank you for contributions to the Halo universe. Have been a fan of the books and games since they first came out, and I have been very much enjoying your trilogy on the Forerunners.

I really don't think any other author could have done a better job on this series, and I'm looking forward to reading Silentium come January and also picking up Hull Zero Three (and other works) sometime soon.

Cheers!
Kenny
 

Re: Looking forward
Date: 10/17/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks for the kind thoughts, Kenny! Now it can be told--SILENTIUM is approaching final revisions and will be published in March of 2013. Stay tuned for more updates!

Writing software recommendations

Date: 06/12/2012 From: Jason Blackford
Location: Phoenixville, PA

Hi Greg!

My name is Jason Blackford, aspiring sci-fi writer and a HUGE fan of yours! As a fairly 'green' writer, I've been looking for tools and resources to help me along with all of my writing projects. I've found quite a few writing programs, some have character development, plot development, etc... but there are so many that I really haven't been able to nail one down that I can use for a long time.

Do you happen to use any software to write your novels that you would recommend? Or, if not, what key elements would you look for if you were searching for novel writing software?

Figured I'd just go straight to the top on this one! :)

Thanks so much for your time, and keep your ideas a'comin'... you are hands down my favorite author of sci-fi!

Take care,
Jason
 

Re: Writing software recommendations
Date: 08/25/2012
From: Greg Bear

Hello, Jason! While I've been intrigued by screenwriting programs that track plot and so on, I've never used anything like that to write a book. Not to say they can't be useful, but my brain just isn't used to being organized that way!

Incredible

Date: 06/10/2012 From: Sam Cooke
Location: UK

Hi Greg, just wanted to tell you I loved Cryptum! I'll be picking up Primordium in the next few days so it'll be read in time for number three... My mind has now been blown wide open, as everything I knew, or thought I knew, about the Forerunners was wrong, but the truth is a million times better. Thank you for writing an incredible book, and you've definitely gained a new fan.

Yours sincerely,
Sam.

PS. is Silentium the final name for #3?
 

Re: Incredible
Date: 08/25/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Sam! But where the Forerunners are concerned, there are many surprises remaining.

Contributions of BioEngineering

Date: 06/09/2012 From: Sofia Rasmussen
Location:


Hi,

I found the information on your blog post insightful as I was researching and writing a series of articles relating to the state of bioengineering and in general, the sciences in academia today. As a contributor to several of the articles on the website, I believe that the resource covers many progressive topics in science including topics in research and applications of the sciences in solving societys problems.

Id like to write a guest article on your blog about a topic relating to one of the topics that Im conducted research in. Would you be interested in working with me on an article?

Thank you, and I look forward to hearing from you soon.

Best,

Sofia
 

Re: Contributions of BioEngineering
Date: 10/17/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Sofia! I'd very much enjoy reading your article, but only post irregularly on this site, so perhaps you should find a good journal, or a more up-to-the-minute science blog? Still, if you'd like to post here, let's take a look and see if it fits!

Ray Bradbury

Date: 06/09/2012 From: Scott Golden
Location: Tucson, AZ

Mr. Bear, I have read many tributes to the memory of Ray Bradbury over the past few days -- yours was the one that brought tears to my eyes.

Thank you
 

Re: Ray Bradbury
Date: 08/25/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Scott. Still can't quite believe he's gone. But then, he really isn't--I've still got lots of memories to mull over and books to read!

Forge of GOD on iBooks

Date: 06/06/2012 From: sky
Location: Texas

I think I may have read this however I'm not sure. I have not been able to find this at a used book store and on iBooks it's like $11.99! I just can't see spending that much money on a book that is 1)old 2) I may have already read! Are you ever going to bring the price down? I recently read a very VERY good yet very new book and only paid $2.99 for the ebook! Why are you charging so much for a digital copy? I can see it if it's a real PHYSICAL book! Are you gonna be like That Clive dude and be that full of yourself? Bring down the prices of your ebooks that are OLD! Not ev1 is rich like you! Even us poor folks have a brain and like to read!
 

Re: Forge of GOD on iBooks
Date: 08/25/2012
From: Greg Bear

For the price of a burger and a beer... Which will last you longer? And you know you've eaten a burger before.

Review posted

Date: 06/02/2012 From: Scott T. Barnes
Location: Lake Forest, CA

Hi Greg,

I wanted to let you know I posted a review of The Mongoliad on NewMyths.com. This will be the featured review for two weeks or so.

-Scott
 

Re: Review posted
Date: 08/25/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Scott! I hope we haven't missed it completely... still running behind on these messages. But the book is getting finished!

Modern Humans in Primordium

Date: 06/01/2012 From: Natalie
Location: Seattle, WA

Hello Mr. Bear, I'd just like to say that Primordium was an even better read the second time around and I can't wait for Silentium. The fact that all of this content relates to just one simple game is fantastic.

Anyhoo, I was wondering if the UNSC vessel that the Chakas construct was being questioned on by the ONI goons was the UNSC Infinity which will play a prominent role in Halo 4. I'm doing some content cleanup on Halopedia and was hoping you could clear this up, or at least wet our appetites and say that it will be revealed in due time. :)

Thank you and best of luck with your future stories!
 

Re: Modern Humans in Primordium
Date: 08/25/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Natalie--

I'll leave that answer to the Halo folks!

Greg

Okay, I've had it

Date: 05/31/2012 From: Kelly Marsh
Location: Camano Island

Greg, this is another post about authors not understanding the words they use, but please understand, it is not aimed at you.

In this case it has to do with the word "brace." A brace of pistols, a brace of knives, a brace of rabbits, etc. Many authors seem to think that "a brace" means whatever number they care to assign to it. "I drew a brace of knives, and springing from my hiding place, threw all six."

To the authors who do not know, "brace" means two. No more, no less. It is sort of like a pair, but without the implication of a matched set. In any event, it means two. Period.

Kelly


 

Re: Okay, I've had it
Date: 07/06/2012
From: Greg Bear

Let's hope we don't need a brace of corrections to get this point across! I vaguely recall violating this rule myself, but don't know where...

Questions from an aspiring writer

Date: 05/29/2012 From: Hayden Robel
Location: Santa Maria, California

Hello Mr. Bear, my name is Hayden Robel. I am an aspiring teenage writer (also a fan of City at the end of time as well as your Halo contributions)currently crafting a "young adult" (as if an ambiguous genre label can be plastered on) science-fiction novel. If you have the time, i was wondering if you could please fill me in on your own process of dialogue construction, in particular crafting authentic/organic( i hate to use the word non-cliche' or even "original") character-to-character conversation particularly the dreaded filler/interstitial chats. The funny thing is it seems that the non-essential dialogue delivery is my greatest writing challenge as of the moment, where as crucial character interactions come naturally to me. Any advice would be greatly appreciated, thank you for your time :)
Sincerely,
Hayden Robel
 

Re: Questions from an aspiring writer
Date: 07/06/2012
From: Greg Bear

Hello, Hayden! Dialog is made simpler if you read your character's words aloud (maybe when no one else is listening!) and see how they sound. The more natural and unforced, the more you WANT to read them aloud, the better the dialog. And listen to how the people around you speak, how different kinds of people choose their words, when they speak and when they don't. Learning how to write dialog never ends! Best of luck with the book.

Hull Zero Three

Date: 05/28/2012 From: Robert Kimball
Location: Patagonia, Az

Just finished reading "Hull Zero three." Couldn't put it down.

I can't help but think the idea for "Hull Zero Three," came in part from a Si-Fi novel I read in the mid-1950s. I can neither remember the title nor the author. I hope you can because I long to read it again.

The story involved a star ship that was a hollowed out meteorite large enough to sustain hundreds of generations of humans on the voyage to another star.

After countless generations the purpose of the mission is lost and must be rediscovered. In fact those on board don't even know it's a star ship.

Robert Kimball
Patagonia, AZ
robertkimball326@gmail.com



 

Re: Hull Zero Three
Date: 05/28/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Robert! The generation starship idea goes back even before Heinlein's UNIVERSE, which was the first classic treatment. Later, Brian Aldiss wrote NON-STOP, another classic--but neither involved a hollowed-out asteroid. Harry Harrison's CAPTIVE UNIVERSE took on both the generation starship and the converted asteroid theme. A very large starship enters our solar system in Arthur C. Clarke's RENDEZVOUS WITH RAMA. And I later used a hollowed-out asteroid as the setting for EON. My guess is you're remembering CAPTIVE UNIVERSE.

question about the sentinels

Date: 05/23/2012 From: Ben
Location: USA

I have a question about the sentinels, if the halos were a builder caste project and the shield worlds were the Didacts project. And the sentinels on onyx were far superior to any we see on the rings, is the explanation that the sentinels on the shield worlds were military grade whereas the ones on the rings were builder security force sentinels.. just a question i was thinking about because of the massive difference in there performances.
 

Re: question about the sentinels
Date: 05/28/2012
From: Greg Bear

I've only dealt lightly with the sentinels, so I'll leave this question to the true experts!
 

Re: question about the sentinels
Date: 06/09/2012
From: Steve
Location: Ireland

I'd believe so Ben, although remember the Halo rings which we know in the game are different to those first proposed by Faber, they are smaller and have a much shorter range. I'd hazard that Faber didn't want to involve warrior servants in the security of the Halo rings, so I'd agree with your conclusion that the sentinels on Halo are builder security, considering those on onyx were of a different design than those on Halo also.
 

Re: question about the sentinels
Date: 10/17/2012
From: Greg Bear

Interesting thoughts, Steve! Thanks.

The Forerunner Saga

Date: 05/18/2012 From: Mikkie Raphael
Location: Cornwall, UK

Dear Mr. Bear, I am currently reading Halo: Cryptum and am finding it a great novel. I love everything to do with Halo and to find a book that looks into the lives of the Forerunners got me really excited. I cant wait to read the rest of the saga but I cannot seem to find a release date (if there is one) for the third book. Please could you let me know when it is, if that is possible.

Keep up the good work!!

Mikkie, 21, UK
 

Re: The Forerunner Saga
Date: 05/22/2012
From: Greg Bear

At this point, looks like late fall or winter. Dates may change!

The Forerunner Saga

Date: 05/16/2012 From: Cameron Gazey
Location: Ontario, Canada

Greg,

Suffice it to say I am a huge Halo fan, and I enjoy it primarily for the story. I've read Cryptum and am currently reading through Primordium right now and there's just ONE thing with reading these books that made me seek you out.

The reason why I loved the idea of this book series so much was because I was very intrigued by the Terminal transcripts found on Halo 3, the first look players ever really got into the minds of Forerunners during their battles with the Flood.

What I wanted to know was whether or not those terminal transcripts from Halo 3 are considered canon and were used as sources of information for writing your series? I ask because of some timeline inconsistencies between these terminal transcripts and your series. I don't want to be rude and list them all out because if the terminals aren't canon then the inconsistencies are moot. Besides, the possibility exists that my questions will also be answered in Silentium.

Thanks in advance! And keep up the great writing, I'll be sure to buy Silentium when it comes out!

- Cameron
 

Re: The Forerunner Saga
Date: 05/22/2012
From: Greg Bear

We're working on those connections. For now, let's just say there are two Didacts...
 

Re: The Forerunner Saga
Date: 06/01/2012
From: Tar Alacrin
Location: Detroit, Michigan

I personally loved the terminals (almost as much as I enjoyed your books) and I hope that they don't change too much (that said; I wouldn't really mind if the dates were switched)

But I really like the style that the terminals were written in, where the story was told through a series of correspondences between the characters, because it allowed you to gain a deep insight into characters and their personalities, but at the same time, (since it didn't have a lot of narrative description) it left a lot of the imagery and "visuals" and course of events up to the reader's imaginations...
What are the chances that we might see a similar style of writing (even a small portion)in future books like silentium?

Thanks, I'm really excited for the next book (and I really hope they bring you back for more series if they can)

--Tar
 

Re: The Forerunner Saga
Date: 06/05/2012
From: Thomas E.
Location: Michigan

Hmm... Two Didact characters or do you mean it as in Didactic? Meaning the Terminals are one teacher and your saga is another?
 

Re: The Forerunner Saga
Date: 07/01/2012
From: Corey Wells
Location: QLD, Aust.

TWO DIDACTS?! Are you referring to Bornstellar taking the memories of DIDACTS and becoming him and then of course the original Didact?
 

Re: The Forerunner Saga
Date: 10/17/2012
From: Greg Bear

Sorry for the delays--been working to get SILENTIUM ready for the printer, now due out this spring. There's a lot more back-and-forth and POV between major characters, and we've been working hard to fit them into what we've heard in the games. That said, there are also going to be a lot of surprises. Let me know what you think, come March!
 

Re: The Forerunner Saga
Date: 10/17/2012
From: Greg Bear

No spoilers, Corey!

Burroughs

Date: 05/16/2012 From: Donal B. Buchanan
Location: Danvers, MA

Back in the 40s when I was living in Arlington, VA (Dad, like many of my missionary relatives and friends, was tapped for intelligence work--he directed the Japanese language school for the Army Security Agency; my mother and sister and a cousin or two also worked as cryptanalysts there). I helped deliver The Evening Star to the ASA (and had the local paper route--we lived up the road from their back entrance). The official Japanese always considered the missionaries probable spies, but we never were--until they attacked Pearl Harbor. At any rate, the world was much different then. The Library of Congress, for instance, actually allowed us teens access to its volumes. 3 or 4 of us would bus in together and each one would ask for a Burroughs books (each different). We'd sit in our carrols quietly reading them through. When done, we'd exchange books and start the next one. It was wonderful (and saved us a bunch of money on books). Now I don't think the teen agers have as free reign there. Sigh. Those were the days, too, when a kid could go to the drugstore and buy all the chemicals he needed to make "rocket fuel". Ours, from a local empty lot, got up about 500 feet (unlike October Sky) on my mixture that was basically gunpowder. I've started "The Forge of God" and it looks to me like a great read. If you are curious about our non-profit epigraphic journal, take a look at www.epigraphy.org. If you mess around under ESOP there, you'll run into some of the work I've done and get an idea what our publications are all about.
 

Re: Burroughs
Date: 05/22/2012
From: Greg Bear

Curious how many members of Congress tapped into ERB back then! No doubt they'd read him as kids; Ronald Reagan mentioned, as I recall, loving Burroughs and Verne.

Wow

Date: 05/16/2012 From: Donal B Buchanan
Location: Danvers, MA

Dear Greg,

I've been an SF nut since the mid 30s when I was a boy in Japan (missionary parents) and met Buck Rogers in the Sunday funnies and Famous Funnies (Matsuzakaya Dept. Store got 2 comics monthly: Famous Funnies and Walt Disney Magazine). I grew up reading Verne, Burroughs' Barsoom, Heinlein's Red Planet and everything SF I could get my hands on--and of course tried my hand at writing it (never published any, thankfully (they were awful). I did manage to publish a couple of mystery novelettes and an article in a computer mag. I was distantly aware of your presence in the SF world, but hadn't ever dipped my toes into your seauntil recently. I just finished "Darwin's Children" (it was my downstairs book) and am almost through "Eon" (my upstairs book; these, to distinguish from my back pocket bookusually a western or a thriller). You are amazing. The depth of the research that must go into your books is fantastic. I congratulate you. I intend to try "Eternity" and "Forge of God" next. As an editor myself (see www.epigraphy.org) I very much appreciate good writing. Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!

All the best,

don
 

Re: Wow
Date: 05/16/2012
From: Greg Bear

My pleasure, Donal! My favorite paperback/magazine source was a liquor store near Bashan Lake Ave in San Carlos, California, near San Diego--way back in 1965-68. Back when books and magazines could be found at liquor stores, drug stores, tobaccanists, etc... Somehow the paperback racks were regularly stocked with Ace editions of ERBurroughs, Tolkien, and a wide range of other lit. Back in those days, you could buy mass market paperbacks of MOBY DICK and Dostoevsky in a grocery store!
 

Re: Wow
Date: 05/18/2012
From: Jonathan Williams
Location: Washington, DC

Donal -- if I may predict, you'll love Forge of God. I've rarely had a book shake me like that one did.
 

Re: Wow
Date: 05/19/2012
From: Doug Dandridge
Location: Tallahassee, FL

All I have to say is thank God for Amazon. It's almost impossible to find some of the older works in the bookstores, unless a movie tie in is on the way or in the theaters. I personally know some professional writers who have reacquired all their writes and self published just so their backlogs would appear in print. I have looked for your books in Barnes and Noble, Greg, and if I'm lucky there will be three novels on the shelf. Now of course I could order them through B&N, but often I will only buy it if it's actually there. Or I could go on Amazon and find almost anything. Even better in the ebook format, because then I can have it in my hands (or on my drive) in minutes. And a comment on libraries. I know my public library does not contain the words New York in it. But still, I look up Robert E Howard and Edgar Rice Burroughs and find two books be each of these legends. Please, give me a break. Any, I enjoy your work, and hope you keep at it.
Doug Dandridge, Science Fiction and Fantasy Writer.
 

Re: Wow
Date: 05/22/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Doug! I have thousands of books on my iPad and Kindle--but I still stop by my local Barnes and Noble and other physical stores. I was in a B&N last night, in fact--talking with a local book club group!

The Mongoliad, E-book edition

Date: 05/15/2012 From: Frank
Location: Houston, TX

Will the electronic version of The Mongoliad be available in any other formats besides Kindle?
 

Re: The Mongoliad, E-book edition
Date: 05/16/2012
From: Greg Bear

For the time being, it's only available on Kindle and trade paper. But a hardcover edition will also be available as later volumes are published.

Signed copies can be ordered from the University Bookstore in Seattle... our massive group signing will be tomorrow, Thursday May 17!
 

Re: The Mongoliad, E-book edition
Date: 05/16/2012
From: Frank
Location: Houston, TX

Hrm, That's too bad. Hopefully it'll come out in more e-formats at some point in the future.

I suppose I'm in a minority, but I love my Sony e-reader, which is unfortunately incompatable with Kindle format.

Job Titles or Con Badge Names Inspired The City at the End of Time.

Date: 05/12/2012 From: David Dorais
Location: Jackson Park house, Lake City, Seattle, WA, USA, N. America, NE Pacific, Terra, Sol, Orion Spur,

A muse is a Brahman sanitation worker...

Minicosm Budder/Gardener/branch Pruner/Coppicer.

Quantun Foam De-Bubbleator--Seattle in-joke.

Universe Seeder/Sower.

Apprentice/Journeymon/Master of Ishanaxade's Groom.

Mnemosynenic Weaver/Loomer/Guildist.

Babel Builder/Beacon/Maintenance Engineer.

Glow Appreciator

Past Memory Re-Booter/Shifter/chancer- also Spacetime, Luck, Fate in place of Past/Present/Future Memory.

Foam Dis-Entangleer/ Mentor.

Sum (over histories) Runner/Stone Mason/ Entrainor.

Middle Trillenniumial Portal Mechanic.

Green Sun Tanning Salon Tech.

Hyperdetic Mathematician/Gengineer aka "Googol-eer".

SuperLuminal Transfate Re-Assembler.

Shenic Boson/Hadron/Quark--ic,al Threadfold-er,ing Engineer/Mechanic.

Nootic Sculptor.

Polybiblios.

Angelin of Eidolonics/Epitome-onics.

Shenity Ambassador to Devas/Demigods/Dakinis/etc.

Worldline Fate Jumper/Diver/Miner/Runner/Splicer.

Tachyonic Technician/Engineer.

Multiversal Merger and Acquisitions Facilitator.

Dark Mass Gravitator

Dark Energy Flow Metrician.

Godel Theoremic Compleator.

Food for Thought. Have Fun Imagining what they DO. Dare you to write short stories describing a "day" in their occupations....

 

Re: Job Titles or Con Badge Names Inspired The City at the End of Time.
Date: 05/12/2012
From: Greg Bear

Wow! An excellent list. We shall revise our resume to reflect having held a few of those positions...

Thanks, David!

halo primordium

Date: 05/12/2012 From: walter
Location: munich/germany

dear "professor" bear,

you know well how mind - and its "tool" brain - work in humans

i finished before a few weeks the second round of your view about the halo-trilogy

as last year, thank you, great work at all

i really can wait for the third chapter, it will be again and for shure something for us "science-gourmets" which love the halo-world

i wish bill and 343 allows you to write a book called "john117"

its time for, and no, im shure it will not lower the interest on this "world" when a few things are clear by knowing more about john 117

again, thank you

walter

ps: and when i finished the third part of the halo trilogy next year i will go into your other work

i really appreciate your brilliant understanding of functioning and development of mind and human race ...

i love how you open space and move our minds faar off any edge to give then the "needed information" ... ^^)
 

Re: halo primordium
Date: 05/16/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Walter!

Don't you think Mitch would like this??

Date: 05/11/2012 From: Roald Laurenson
Location: near western isles

http://www.nature.com/news/ancient-migration-coming-to-america-1.10562

The plot is definitely thickening, isn't it.

Pausing a moment to reckon how much I have enjoyed the Darwin's books, and their characters.

Much agreeing with 'still having it' per Hull Zero Three comment. Yes, that book really sticks.

Best, Greg. It's the May greys here; I quite like them. During such times, all particularly advances.

Clive
 

Re: Don't you think Mitch would like this??
Date: 05/16/2012
From: Greg Bear

Archaeology and anthropology have been amazing and mind-bending for decades, and they're only going to get better!
 

Re: Don't you think Mitch would like this??
Date: 07/05/2012
From: Pear Lover
Location:

I recently read Stephen Baxter's EVOLUTION. I think a lot of it is still pretty fringe, but feels prescient to me.

Sort of in response to a recent posting here about the effect THE FORGE OF GOD had on a reader: EVOLUTION lushly describes the Yucatan comet strike - very bad business that almost took out life on the planet, while not having to demolish it.
 

Re: Don't you think Mitch would like this??
Date: 07/19/2012
From: Greg Bear

Mr. Baxter is one of my favorites.

Poul Anderson Appreciation

Date: 05/11/2012 From: Sean M. Brooks
Location: Lawrence, MA

Dear Mr. Bear:

I thought you and any interested readers might be interested to find out a British fan of the works of your father in law named Dr. Paul Shackley has recently created a new blog called "Poul Anderson Appreciation." The blog hasd many notes and essays related to or about the works of Poul Anderson.

Full disclosure, Dr. Shackley graciously "published" a few of my own notes about Poul Anderson

Sincerely, Sean M. Brooks
 

Re: Poul Anderson Appreciation
Date: 05/16/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Sean--can you send us a link?
 

Re: Poul Anderson Appreciation
Date: 05/16/2012
From: Sean M. Brooks
Location: Lawrence, MA

Dear Mr. Bear:

Yes, I sent you the link to the blog called "Poul Anderson Appreciation" by email. Hope you get it!

Interested readers should be able to find the blog by googling "Poul Anderson Appreciation."

Dr. Shackley kindly "published" three notes I wrote on his blog. The most interesting one is probably the essay I wrote on Sandra Miesel's Technic Civlilization Chronology.

Sincerely, Sean M. Brooks

Asteroid Mining at last

Date: 05/09/2012 From: Nemo
Location: Australia

Finally someone is going to mine asteroids for real, I hope they do hollow out asteroids like Eros when space mining is larger and more profitable.
 

Re: Asteroid Mining at last
Date: 05/16/2012
From: Greg Bear

Ah, we can dream! Some asteroids will likely not respond well to that sort of hollowing, however. Clumpy and aggregated, not so much a solid, continuous piece of rock!
 

Re: Asteroid Mining at last
Date: 06/06/2012
From: sky
Location: texas

Are you kidding? We can't even land on one nor stop one! Let alone mine one! Keep it at least a little real! Someday perhaps but not in our lifetime.
 

Re: Asteroid Mining at last
Date: 02/05/2013
From: Greg Bear

Indeed, stopping one could pose a problem. But landing on one, especially one zipping by at closer than twenty thousand kilometers, may not be so difficult!

I might point out the introduction to Forbidden Planet, one of my favorite movies, tells us that the first moon landing occurred in the final decade of the 21st century. Thirteen years later, we were there. (I blame a severe time warp for not getting to your message earlier, sky--apologies!)

Firesign Theater

Date: 05/09/2012 From: Bob Schumacher
Location: Milwaukee Wisconsin

I was catching up on some books I'd missed, and picked up a copy of "City at the End Of Time". Tihs was the first time I've ever seen a printed reference to Firesign Theater.

Thank you. This partialy restores my faith in mankind. Maybe we really are all Bozo's on this bus.

Sign me Ahh...Clem. Or better yet, George Leroy Tirebiter.
 

Re: Firesign Theater
Date: 05/16/2012
From: Greg Bear

Love Firesign! Even indoctrinated our kids.

Primordial Gravemind

Date: 05/04/2012 From: Thomas E.
Location: Michigan

First I wanted to say that the Forerunner saga so far has been a delight and I am enjoying them more and more with multiple readings. However I am curious to know, if it is not too spoiler-ish, if the Primordial at the end of Primordium was indeed an ancient form of Gravemind as stated by both the Lord of Admirals and the Didact. There seems to be a little confusion amongst some of the fans if this is true and I am hoping you can shed some light on the matter. Thank you in advance and keep up the fantastic work.
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 05/08/2012
From: Greg Bear

More light will indeed be cast on this topic in HALO: SILENTIUM. Still writing madly!
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 05/10/2012
From: Emilio
Location: NY

Well first of all I think you are the best sci-fi author out there, but I came here to ask you these two questions:
First, in Halo Silentium are you going to tell us the size of the greater ark, and second did it survive all this years like Installation 00 or it no longer exists?
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 05/10/2012
From: Eduardo Andr←s
Location:

Hello Mr Greg BearI am very glad to have found your website at the endI love all his books of halo, I am a person who thinks importantly though books are very important for the world, but what is more important is to know the author know as thought, as it takes its decisions with regard to his current work, as it has been forged their way.When does planned more or less the third book in the forerunner silentium which goes on sale?I leave greetings from monterrey, Nuevo Leon; Mexico
 

Re: HALO: SILENTIUM
Date: 05/12/2012
From: walter
Location: munich/germany

*halo silentium* !? oh yes ! ^^)
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 05/16/2012
From: Greg Bear

Writing about this even now, Emilio. And the 343 team just sent me a cover proof for SILENTIUM. It's fantastic. Hope to post soon!
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 05/16/2012
From: Greg Bear

Hello, Eduardo! Greetings from far Seattle. SILENTIUM is currently scheduled for January 13 next year.
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 05/16/2012
From: Thomas E.
Location: Michigan

Excellent. It is a shame we must wait until after Halo 4's release to read it however I have a feeling there is a very good story related reason for this arrangement. I do have another quick question. Will we ever learn the name of the ancient Human civilization? Were they simply known as the Human-San 'Shyuum Alliance or did they have a real name like the Forerunner's Ecumene?
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 05/20/2012
From: jesse
Location: South Carolina

Hello Mr. Bear I for one was blown by the content of both of the Halo books and await the last book of the series. I had never hear of you in till I read Cryptum and I feel in love with your writing style!!! I have been a Halo fan since day one and my devotion to the series has not wavered one bit and I feel like you have done it every justice it deserves!!!! I will start reading you other books shortly..
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 05/22/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Jesse!
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 05/24/2012
From: Allen
Location: Georgia

Hello Mr. Bear, I have read Cryptum and Primordium and I'm a big fan! I would just like to know, is there any bit of information that you can tell us about Silentium? Also, can you tell us when we should expect more info on the book? Thanks!
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 05/25/2012
From: David
Location: Rochester

Hello! Love your books about the forerunners so far, you make them truly seem alien, compared to some other ancient species I have seen in the sci-fi genre. It's refreshing and it's awesome to see the ancient history! Can't wait to get Silentium on January 13th! :D
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 05/27/2012
From: Emilio
Location: NY

Well hello itᄡs me again! Well I forgot to ask you this in my last post, sorry, but well this fact has been around my mind for a long time since I read primordium: how could the Forerunners destroy the Precursors if the Precursors were the most powerful race in the universe? Are we going to have an answer to that in Silentium or it will remain a mistery?
Well I want to thank you for answering my last question and for listening to your fans!!
PS: I swear that this will be my last question and thanks again!!!! :)
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 05/28/2012
From: Greg Bear

SILENTIUM and HALO 4 will contain a lot of surprises! And other than that, I can say no more.
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 05/28/2012
From: Greg Bear

And that means I have to finish it! Back to work. Thanks, David!
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 05/28/2012
From: Greg Bear

There's power, and there's power! No more can be revealed for now! Thanks, Emilio.
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 06/01/2012
From: JuanCarlos Bravo
Location: United States

I will stare at you now.

*Stares. Intently.*
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 06/03/2012
From: Andres
Location: Puebla

Greetings from Puebla Mr Bear!!! Well I loved primordium and crytum, but after finishing cryptum i had a lot of curiosity about the Organon the precursor artifact that could activate all precursor technology, then i read primordium thinking that you would answer all our questions about the Organon, but you didnt, will you show us what the organon truly is and can you tell us if it will be explained in the third book??? And thank you very much for your time, keep that way Mr Bear!!
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 06/07/2012
From: tj
Location: N.S.

i was wondering if you were going to focus on 07-343GS and his hunt for the librarian,in the last novel you made spark say the following (i know were to find her)and that is a big spoiler alert for some reader i think.
 

Re:halo silentium
Date: 06/18/2012
From: Caspian
Location: France

In halo primordium guilty spark takes over a ship at the end of the book so I wonder if he takes over the UNSC infinity sInce it has "every piece of forerunner technology "from the war and he says he knows where to find the libraryen which is possibly Reqiuem but on the didact gets there first and on the end of the E3 demo we can see the forerunner symbole for the didact In red up side down and he says "I have waited a long time for this day reclaimer" and only the forerunners call the humans reclaimers and we know from halo cryptium that the didact lost his children in the forerunner human war so he isn't too keen on humans but also the enemy's on the E3 demo the promethien knight us kowing that promethens are a social class in forerunner life being higher in rank then the normal warriors or in a manner of speech being the "elite force" the forerunner equivalent to the UNSC high comm (high command)
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 06/26/2012
From: jason
Location: canada

two questions im sure you cant answer but hope will be addressed in the upcoming novel, first i have heard it suggested that the primordial is both precursor and flood and that becoming a gravemind was in fact a technological advancement for the species is this true?

and second if the precursors were just some kind of super graveminds how did the flood ever come into existence without a sentient life form to create them or sustain them what is there true origin?

thank you for your novels and i look forward to the next one ~jason
 

The Forerunner Saga.
Date: 06/28/2012
From: Austin
Location: Mississippi

Hello Mr. Bear, and may I say what a very vivid and intriguing series you have given the Halo Community thus far. Your writing style is by far the one of the best I have encountered and hope to read more of your novels both on the Halo Univerese and in other projects. Almost ever question I have to ask would result in a spoiler if you were to answer so I will hold on to those questions for the time being. However, there is one question that I would be very happy to have answered. In your writing process, do you have a certain....hobbie or perhaps something else that inspires your work? For example, my friend and I our working on our own sci-fi series and we both have different ways of inspiration, for me its music, for him its visualization.
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 07/06/2012
From: Luke
Location: AZ

I have been following the forerunner saga with more intent then any of the other halo universe books (I've read all of them minus Evolutions, which I am starting today) and greatly admire your work! When beginning Primordium, I was very confused as to whose point of view I was viewing from, but you made that clear later on, so, my question is, whose point of view is next? I would like to know if it will be Bornstellar/The Didact, 343 Guilty Spark (or his former self), or possibly even the Primordial? Thanks for writing such great books, I look forward to your reply.

True Halo Fan,
Luke S.
(No Star Wars pun intended!)
 

343 is back.
Date: 07/11/2012
From: Alex
Location: "Forge World," Installation 04

Mr. Bear, you are an amazing author, your work in the Halo series has captivated me and shown many new perspectives. So for that I must thank you. I must also thank you for bringing back one of my all time favorite characters even in the heart-tearing way that you did. So, thank you!
 

343 is back.
Date: 07/23/2012
From: Greg Bear

My pleasure, Alex! Finishing up rough draft on SILENTIUM now.
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 07/23/2012
From: Greg Bear

A new and interesting POV will supply many of the perspectives of SILENTIUM. Finishing the book very soon now!
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 08/20/2012
From: Dan
Location:

Hello Mr. Bear, your books are an inspiration to the Halo fan base. It's fantastic to read (and re-read) your compelling and fascinating prequels to the Halo video game storyline. Thank you for bringing alive the story of the Forerunners and being so patient to directly tie it all in to the Halo cannon. I look forward to reading your third installment to this story on 13Jan13!!!

A loyal fan,
Dan
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 08/25/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Dan! Book is complete and in revision now.
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 08/26/2012
From: Austin Douglas Ford
Location: New Braunfels, Texas

This is great news! I am looking forward to both Halo 4 and Siletium, early next year. I do have a question for you, though. I was wondering how much of an impact you made on the flow or general structure of the Halo 4 campaign. I was also wondering how much of a role The Composer will play in your next book.
Thanks in advance for getting back to me!
 

The Forerunner Saga.
Date: 08/26/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Austin!

Among my hobbies are playing vinyl records (and all other forms of music) and doing the occasional sketch. So I suppose I'm both visual and musical!
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 08/26/2012
From: Greg Bear

Great questions, Jason! All will be revealed (well, a lot of it, anyway) in SILENTIUM. Thanks for your interest and patience!

Greg
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 10/17/2012
From: Greg Bear

Stare received! Book rushing forward. Thanks, JuanCarlos.
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 10/17/2012
From: Greg Bear

We're in the final stages of SILENTIUM. Big mysteries prove to be big problems for Forerunners. 'Nuff said!
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 10/17/2012
From: Greg Bear

343 has many lives and many situations. SILENTIUM adds to the biography, but does not come near to completing it!
 

Re:halo silentium
Date: 10/17/2012
From: Greg Bear

343 does get around! As to his future adventures--well, SILENTIUM only does a bit of filling in for the past.
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 10/17/2012
From: Greg Bear

The collaboration has been particularly fruitful, Austin! And great fun. You be the judge! HALO 4 is awesome. I'm proud to have contributed even a little.
 

Character Development.
Date: 10/23/2012
From: Tucker
Location: Washington

Hello Mr. Bear.
I have greatly enjoyed your first two novels regarding the halo universe. I am really enjoyed learning of the Didact and his story in the universe. From the terminals in Halo 3, and from references about the Didact in the Halo: Anniversary terminals, the community has learned about his character, that he certainly has an emotional drive. Every character in every story ticks, and due to some teaser trailers around many think the Didact will be an anatogonist in the upcoming games. If I were to adopt this idea I would fail to explain why he would go from having some respect for humanity to "I hate them all and I am going to be a villian." I rather doubt that you will be able to share a lot of info regarding this but I was wondering if you would be able to explain what makes him tick as a character, what makes him happy, sad, angry, etc... I am aware that Guily Spark suggests that he has a massive temper in Terminal 10 of Anniversary. Again I doubt that you can shed some light but if you can great, and if not is this going to be one of those "stay tuned" type of things. Sorry about the lengths of his and thanks for your time.
 

Character Development.
Date: 10/31/2012
From: Greg Bear

All will be addressed in some detail in SILENTIUM. Sorry--can't leak the essentials until March! But in the meantime, you'll learn a lot more about the Didact in HALO 4 in November. If your personna in the game survives! Lots of startling challenges ahead, Tucker.
 

The Didact.
Date: 12/16/2012
From: Diana D.
Location: San Diego, California

Greetings Mr. Bear. I followed your novels Cryptum and Primordial which are remarkable novels of science-fiction and I appreciate your work. I know you might not be able to answer my question until Silentium is reseased, but I will still post my question.
It is a little hard for me to follow both novels and books about who is The Didact in Halo 4 Ur-didact or Bornstellar-Didact?
I cannot wait for Silentium. Keep up the good work and Happy Holidays!
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 12/17/2012
From: faraz
Location:

Hello Mr.Bear
I loved the books enjoyed them alot but there is this question that i have been asking is that why did the forerunners did not index themselves for repopulation like other species and chose humans as their successors when they could have carried on themselves wil silentium shed light on it?
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 12/21/2012
From: Andy
Location: Hampshire, UK

Hi Greg,

I would first like to say I absolutely loved both forerunner saga books so far, I've read them both twice.

I have a question, are we ever going to learn what the Primordial said to the humans that made them commit suicide?

P.S, when are we going to learn which Didact was in Halo 4? Was it Bornsteller, or the original?

Are we going to learn anything more about the precursors and why they are willing to put the galaxy through so much death (the flood) just to find the right inheritor of the mantle
 

Future With 343 Industries
Date: 01/21/2013
From: PINKe
Location: Brampton, Canada

Living in the 'Haloverse', is your future with 343 Industries more like the destiny of the forerunners or the humans? Great Story. Great writing. I can't wait for March.
 

The Didact.
Date: 02/01/2013
From: Greg Bear

It is all revealed! The Ur-Didact is in the game, and his transformation is recorded in SILENTIUM. Thanks, Diana!
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 02/01/2013
From: Greg Bear

Fascinating question, faraz! Let me know what you think after you read Silentium...
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 02/01/2013
From: Greg Bear

All in Silentium, Andy! Thanks for your questions. (And just to reveal one fact, the Ur-Didact is in HALO 4.)
 

Future With 343 Industries
Date: 02/03/2013
From: Greg Bear

Thanks! We're also working on a little surprise for those who study SILENTIUM closely...
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 03/19/2013
From: Brandon
Location: Shreveport Louisiana

Greetings Mr. Bear. Sorry if I'm necroing an old discussion but this is the only place I've seen where fans can communicate.

Anyway, I would just like to say I adore your novels. I'm not ashamed to admit that they have helped me out during some bad personal times. My question though is regarding Silentium:

In the book the Precursors/Key Mind describes their total knowedge measuring around 100 billion years. What I'm confused on is does that mean they have litterally been around for 100 billion years, thus predating the universe, which has some interesting implications, or their sum total of knowedge would equal 100 billion years of collective experience?
 

Re: Primordial Gravemind
Date: 04/10/2013
From: Greg Bear

Good to hear from you, Brandon! Indeed, the big question is, were they around all that time, or did they inherit wisdom and knowledge from THEIR creators--and how far back does that go? How far back do this universe and all other universes go?
 

Forerunner Rates
Date: 10/10/2013
From: Wes
Location:

Hello Mr. Bear,

First of all I would like to say how much I've enjoyed the Forerunner Saga. It is great to see those mysterious beings finally fleshed out. So much fan speculation (which was fun!) before now. Seeing the Ur-Didact and Librarian in Halo was spectacular! The Domain videos was a great bonus as well.

I found the idea of Forerunners having various rates and going through specialized mutations to be very interesting.

My question is....do you think we will ever see some official concept art/images from you or 343 showing the various rates/mutations? It would be great to see some pictures of Manipulars, Miners, Builders, Catalog, etc.

Thanks!
 

Forerunner Rates
Date: 10/15/2013
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Wes--

That's all in the capable hands of 343 right now! I'd enjoy seeing those realizations as well.

Greg

Eon

Date: 05/03/2012 From: Allen Vance
Location: Atlanta GA USA

Greg, I have read SF avidly for 40 years, and that makes for a lot of novels and stories.

EON is truly singular, and I am compelled to read it every two years or so.

SONGS OF EARTH AND POWER still haunts me. I think it haunts you in some way as well.

HULL ZERO THREE - you still have it.

Thank you for your tremendous contributions to the field.
 

Re: Eon
Date: 05/08/2012
From: Greg Bear

Very good to hear, Allen. More books to come!

Just thought you should know....

Date: 05/03/2012 From: Kelli Davidson
Location:

Mr. Bear - one of your characters: Vergil Ulam is up to no good on my eBook review page. While I am sure another writer, particuarly a very accomplished one such as yourself, would not do such a thing, I still thought you should know what someone is doing in the name of one of your famous characters . One of my children showed me several books of yours that I had purchased for them verifying that the character, Vergil Ulam, is indeed a character you created. The least Mr. Ulam could have done was to purchase or borrow the book and at least get the Chapter info correct before he told everyone that using my book caused his mess to turn into grey goo and nearly burned down his lab. While the post was amusing, it could mislead many beginning canners. Words are meant to be played with and while it may not be appreciated, it is still completely legal. Please see what your character is up to: http://www.amazon.com/NANO-CANNING-BASIC-RECIPES-INSTRUCTION-ebook/product-reviews/B007HEXNY2/ref=dp_top_cm_cr_acr_txt?ie=UTF8&showViewpoints=1
 

Re: Just thought you should know....
Date: 05/03/2012
From: Greg Bear

Very uncool! Maybe we need to find a use for canned trolls. The other reviews lead me to believe your book is excellent. And that's what it's all about, really.

Mysterious Objects Punching Holes In Weird Saturn Ring

Date: 04/25/2012 From: Steven Becker
Location: San Jose

Yahoo had the following title for an article this morning:
"Mysterious Objects Punching Holes In Weird Saturn Ring"

Not exactly the same as 'Forge,' but if I see even a single silver spider today, not another penny goes into my 401k.
 

Re: Mysterious Objects Punching Holes In Weird Saturn Ring
Date: 05/03/2012
From: Greg Bear

Start stocking up on Library of Congress CDs! Actually, there have been a lot of wonderful things going on in the rings since we first started looking, back in the eighties. I believe it was Jerry Pournelle who expressed gratitude that Kepler didn't see such goings on. It would only have confused him!

Asteroid mining looks like a reality...

Date: 04/24/2012 From: Simeon
Location: UK

Its Official: James Cameron and Google Unveil Plans for Asteroid-Mining

http://io9.com/5904599/its-official-james-cameron-and-google-unveil-plans-for-asteroid+mining?utm_campaign=socialflow_io9_facebook&utm_source=io9_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow

Quick question about the number of Halos in Cryptum and Primordium

Date: 04/21/2012 From: Brian Beatty
Location: Ireland

Hi Greg, first off big fan of the Halo franchise, love what you,ve done with the Forerunner Trilogy so far.

I just have a question regarding how many halos there are and I'm hoping you could clear it up for me. In Halo: Cryptum it states 12 halos(30,000km in size) were made by the Master Builder and another 6(10,000km in size) were made by the Librarian. In the battle of the forerunner capital 10 of the larger halos were destroyed while 1 escaped to join the Librarian's 6 and was repaired i think and the last 1 of those 12 was in Medicant Bias' hands. In Primordium that ring is found by Didact and made smaller(30,000 down to 10,000km) and brought to the greater ark.

Ok so here's the question-based on that info shouldn't there be 8 halos instead of 7 composing the Halo array by the time the games take place? I could be wrong but I'm hoping you could clear this up. Thanks for your time.
 

Re: Quick question about the number of Halos in Cryptum and Primordium
Date: 05/03/2012
From: Greg Bear

We're noting all these very carefully, Brian! And book number three is in process right now...

Slant and The Holographic Tupac

Date: 04/21/2012 From: Benjamin Stone
Location:

The Tupac "Hologram" reminded me of the party scene in Slant.

That is all.

Actually, no it's not: When the hell is somebody going to turn Slant into a feature film? It's taken way too long!

If I made the movie there would be a hologram of Nirvana at the party playing "Tourettes." ;)
 

Re: Slant and The Holographic Tupac
Date: 05/03/2012
From: Greg Bear

Ah, immortality! Thanks, Benjamin.

Book

Date: 04/20/2012 From: T.
Location: Kansas

When will the third book of the Forerunner series be released?
Also, what will it be called, or will you still not say it?
 

Re: Book
Date: 05/03/2012
From: Greg Bear

We're looking at January. Working title is HALO: SILENTIUM.

Opening steampunk book and game store in Edmonds

Date: 04/19/2012 From: Brynn Watson
Location: Edmonds, WA

Hello!

I'm having a Grand Opening June 30th for a steampunk-themed book and game store called Otherworlds selling sci-fi, steampunk, fantasy, and horror goodness, and I wanted to invite you! I've heard you like to keep a pretty low profile so maybe you wouldn't want to come that day, or maybe come that day but not tell anyone, and eat creampuffs and listen to the band, or whatever strikes your fancy. It will be in downtown Edmonds. I'm inviting all kinds of people I admire, that made me want to have a store selling Imagination in the first place, so if you find yourself in the area, stop in!
Thanks so much for reading, and your time.
 

Re: Opening steampunk book and game store in Edmonds
Date: 05/03/2012
From: Greg Bear

Very good, Brynn! Let me know time and address and we'll post it here.
 

Re: Opening steampunk book and game store in Edmonds
Date: 05/03/2012
From: Brynn Watson
Location: Edmonds, WA

Thank you so very much! It's in Edmonds, in the Old Milltown: 203 5th Ave S, Edmonds 08020.

Here are the links: https://www.facebook.com/events/161615817297680/ and otherworldsstore.com

Thanks again, and I hope you stop by sometime! It looks like we'll be having a great time!

Brynn
 

Re: Opening steampunk book and game store in Edmonds
Date: 05/08/2012
From: Greg Bear

Saturday in Edmonds, June 30, from 10 am to nine pm. Good luck with the new store, Brynn!
 

Re: Opening steampunk book and game store in Edmonds
Date: 05/08/2012
From: Brynn Watson
Location: Edmonds, WA

Thank you so much! Thanks for writing awesome books and making worlds!

Primordium

Date: 04/17/2012 From: Ivan
Location: Albuquerque, NM

I loved it. I feel saddened when other readers are complaining about how it was not "action packed" enough or it was just walking, because they missed so much. It was a great work that has added a lot to the Forerunners and the Halo universe itself. I enjoyed Chakas from Cryptum and felt bad for him being a stunted human cast into the advanced Forerunner conflict, but to learn what happen to him after was terrible. I enjoyed my journey around that Halo installation and can wait to see where all your going to take it too next.

P.S.
The memory/ personality imprint from the old humans, like the Lord Admiral, that the Didact fought with completely blew my mind. Where did the inspiration for that come from?
 

Re: Primordium
Date: 05/03/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Ivan! There are a lot of echoes of these ideas in book three--and... well, my lips are sealed... for the time being!
 

Re: Primordium
Date: 05/07/2012
From: Ivan
Location: Albuquerque

HEY! I can't believed I missed you here in Albuquerque! You were at a local book store for a book signing! I got one of the signed copies anyway, and they were out of The Forge of God which my main mission.
 

Re: Primordium
Date: 05/08/2012
From: Greg Bear

Good signing in Albuquerque! And great barbecue with Walter Jon Williams after. Sorry to miss you--perhaps next time?

Asimov and Halo

Date: 04/12/2012 From: Vicktor Russell
Location: Avondale, AZ, USA

Hello Mr. Bear, I am doing a senior research paper on Isaac Asimov. I recently came across a source in which you and two other men discussed Asimov's work. I thought it was a pretty helpful resource, but I have a few questions that provided are responded to quickly enough I can use, with your permission of course, to prove my thesis of Asimov's foundation series effecting even today's daily life. My questions are: when writing the forerunner books (which I am a huge fan of) did you see many resemblances from Asimov's foundation series and in halo? When writing the forerunner books did your past experience with Asimov's books influence your writing of the forerunner books? Would you say that today's society has been affected by Asimov's foundation series and in what ways could you say? I would thank you kindly for telling to my questions as soon as you can, please and thank you so much.
 

Re: Asimov and Halo
Date: 05/03/2012
From: Greg Bear

Hello, Viktor-- Check out my own excursion in Isaac's universe, FOUNDATION AND CHAOS. I've said often that the Foundation galaxy is so huge that it could encompass many other story lines. And no one writing science fiction today escapes Isaac's influence!

Picting from Eon

Date: 04/06/2012 From: Stuart Krivis
Location: Ohio

I saw a video from Google's Project Glass today and I immediately thought of picting.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9c6W4CCU9M4

I do have grave reservations about the implications of many new technologies as relates to privacy, so I'm not ready for Google Glasses yet. However, I can see how they or something like them could also change our lives for the better.
 

Re: Picting from Eon
Date: 04/07/2012
From: Greg Bear

I'm definitely looking forward to them. Something like these glasses also pop up in QUANTICO and MARIPOSA. They could be great fun and very useful!

Anvil of Stars and Dawin's children

Date: 04/05/2012 From: David Siebert
Location: Florida

Is that the end of those two series? I really would like to know more about what happens next to mankind in both of those books.
 

Re: Anvil of Stars and Dawin's children
Date: 04/07/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, David. I had hoped to write three books, but a couple of nasty and uncalled-for publishing difficulties intervened, and those plans have been put aside for the time being. Still perking in my thoughts, however!
 

Re: Anvil of Stars and Dawin's children
Date: 04/08/2012
From: Roald Laurenson
Location: near western isles

Well, it could be a hiatus would end up giving both of these a chance to be even better Greg, trying to look at the bright side.

I am thinking so because the world is changing about us, and so there are opportunities. Nuts to those who held you back, though, as both of these feel ripe for continuance, in their time.

I am sure it will be interesting, and as surely enjoyed by those who like your attentions.

Best,
Clive
 

Re: Anvil of Stars and Darwin's children
Date: 05/12/2012
From: Greg Stewart
Location: Columbus, Mississippi, USA

Greg,

I'm very happy to hear you are still considering additional works in those two series. I know I'd really enjoy seeing how you'd bring additional closure to these stories.

However, I really hope you'll consider three more works for the Forge-Anvil series... one on the children finding their world and building their future... another on the those rebuilding the human race and a human-friendly biosphere in our solar system... and perhaps even a third to bring these two threads of humanity (and maybe even the children on other Ships of the Law) back together.

I'm eager to read where you'd take all of this!

Greg in Mississippi
 

Re: Anvil of Stars and Darwin's children
Date: 05/16/2012
From: Greg Bear

Indeed, sounds like a terrific run of stories. Thanks, Greg!
 

Re: Anvil of Stars and Dawin's children
Date: 06/11/2012
From: Eddie
Location: Florida

Hi Mr. Bear,I had read Anvil of Stars many years ago and had thought this a great book.This is just my thoughts but would like them to be known.It seems like when they have done book to movies it seems like all they can do is pick out mediocre one's at best,even with all the cgi and all they offer now if the story cant carry it it is still no good and a lot of hype is put into it to feed the public garbage.
Which is why I have wondered for many years now why haven't they made at least a mini series of Anvil? it has the great story would have the effects you describe in the book and would make an awesome mini series if not a series like battlestar.Yours would have a lot more going for it though.I just wished real writers like you had their due on the big screen
Ed.
 

Re: Anvil of Stars and Dawin's children
Date: 07/05/2012
From: David Siebert
Location: Forida

Actually I can imagine even more books in the Anvil series.
I would love to know more about the Cords/Braids/Brothers. Maybe a back story or one about their survival or not extinction.
And of course more about the Benefactors.
I know that writing a story about such alien aliens may be impossible to do well but one can dream.
The other option I find interesting are the Ships from Anvil. I know they have a rule about any self replicating machine that reaches sentience must destroy it's self but that seems like such a waste to me.
I am a programer and right now I am trying to think like one of the humans on the ship.
This machine seems to have a hard coded directive that it can not ignore. Think of this as being like a ROM chip.
Okay so why not create an imperfect copy of it's self that has all of it's capabilities but now it is hard coded to not replicate it's self. It may self repair but not replicate.
This would allow the Ship to survive at least for a while and become part of the new human community on the planet. You could even have a sub plot of the ship trying to keep functioning while trying to stay not evil. Sort of it not wanting to live anymore but feeling obligated to help the humans that it has come to know and respect.
 

Re: Anvil of Stars and Dawin's children
Date: 07/23/2012
From: Greg Bear

Cool ideas, David. Your mind is humming like a Tesla on a long straight freeway!
 

Re: Anvil of Stars and Dawin's children
Date: 10/17/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Eddie! A long-running topic on this site, as you can tell. Whether Anvil of Stars or Forge of God--or a combo of the two--will ever make it to the screen remains an open question. Meanwhile, as you say, much inferior stories get made, and quickly sink out of sight. Sighing won't help, but I do it anyway!

EON Audio Book.. Thanks!

Date: 04/04/2012 From: Mike Fuller
Location: Orlando, FL

Thanks for getting Stefan Rudnicki to read this... He did the book justice!
 

Re: EON Audio Book.. Thanks!
Date: 04/07/2012
From: Greg Bear

Good to hear you liked it, Mike!
 

Re: EON Audio Book.. Thanks!
Date: 04/25/2012
From: Art Behrman
Location: seattle

I wholeheartedly agree. It was with great pleasure that I found Eon, Eternity, and Legacy read by Stefan Rudnicki at Audible.com. I sincerely hope that he will next tackle Songs Of Earth And Power.
 

Re: EON Audio Book.. Thanks!
Date: 05/03/2012
From: Greg Bear

He does a terrific job, indeed!

Will you do anything in the Hull Zero Three universe?

Date: 04/03/2012 From: Adam Campbell
Location: Canada

You've probably already answered this sometime, but I can't find anything. I don't necessarily mean a direct sequel, but something that is in the same universe, or was that a one time thing, and you let us decide what happens afterwards?
 

Re: Will you do anything in the Hull Zero Three universe?
Date: 04/07/2012
From: Greg Bear

Nothing planned as of now, Adam, but never say never!
 

Re: Will you do anything in the Hull Zero Three universe?
Date: 04/08/2012
From: Roald Laurenson
Location: near western isles

I was just thinking of this, compared to possible Darwin's Children and Anvil of Stars continuance.

I really appreciate Hull Zero Three. It returns to thoughts often, in one way for its beautiful images in the midst of truly dangerous toil, and the mysteries in those beauties. Examples would be the wolf-advanced-woman, with a very strong and true heart; and the attractive hunter, cut down by a further mystery when this has been earned and is needed.

The greatest beauty, though, is in the moral point, the moral question, and how it is laid out in the kind of poet's twist, set so that it can't be forgotten.

I guess I would like to leave that question so strongly hanging in the air. Much better, as we must now consider exactly the same point about ourselves, before there would be any chance of future exploration.

I like to hear and see and feel that question, where as many of us as possible, and as purely, can consider it. Where we can, then, find to act on it, and realize the future we wish for can be built from such answers, will actually be built from such answers.

Regards to each.

Tooth snout, good name that.

Date: 04/01/2012 From: Julian
Location: Melbourne

Hi Greg,

It's been a few years since I posted, sadly this is because its been a few years since I had a holiday and that is the time I save to enjoy your fine works. No holiday is complete for me without at least one of your books.

This holiday I took with me Hull Zero Three and Halo: Cryptum.

Within the first chapters of Hull Zero Three, in fact it was on reading the line "Tooth snout, good name that" I had to put the book down for a few minutes, look at the sky and just smile. I can't quite explain what it was about that line other than to say it was like meeting up with an old friend. From here the book only got better and took me on another fantastic journey reminiscent of Eon and Forge of God series. I did not want it to end.

I was curious about the references to "Dreamtime" and wondered if they were based on Australian Indigenous writings? There seemd to be a lot of similarities. (BTW there is a great book by A.W. Reed titled "Aboriginal Myths: Tales of the Dreamtime" for some very well researched Australian Dreamtime tales)

Halo: Cryptum was next and quite an extreme from Hull Zero Three - admittedly I was sceptical of a game based story however once again, a couple of chapters and I was hooked. Primordium was ordered immediately after finishing this and I cant wait to get into it - this time I won't be waiting for a holiday to read it!

Anyway, I just wanted to say thank you Greg, my holiday was awesome!

Please keep up the great work.

Cheers
Julian
 

Re: Tooth snout, good name that.
Date: 04/07/2012
From: Greg Bear

Good to hear from you, Julian! I have quite a few books on Australian myth and the Dreamtime, and have indeed been influenced. I'll look up the Reed volume. Thanks for that and for the very kind words.

Thank you

Date: 03/29/2012 From: ben
Location: united kingdom

I have just read halo cryptum and primordium and i must say best halo books by far. when does the third book come out?
 

Re: Thank you
Date: 04/07/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Ben! Due in January, I believe.

Bravo

Date: 03/28/2012 From: Thierry Panchaud
Location: Paris France

I have just read your novel Darwin's Radio (in french). I thank you very much for having written it. It is so clever and enthusiastic. For once it is not about "good & bad". It makes me dream of a new world. A new man who is not more capable, but different. Very stimulating. So, once more, thank you.
I will read Darwin's Children as soon as I can.
 

Re: Bravo
Date: 04/07/2012
From: Greg Bear

Merci beaucoup, Thierry! And if you can find it, take a look at an excellent French documentary by Jean Crepu and Ali Saib, DR. VIRUS AND MR. HYDE, a TGA production for France 5 and TVOntario.

Great post on John Carter

Date: 03/20/2012 From: John Harwood
Location: Austin, TX

Hi Greg, I just wanted to take a minute to thank you for that excellent and thoughtful post on John Carter. For better or worse, I always find myself rooting for the box office results of the movies I enjoy, but I like the thought of just filing this one away as a personal favorite and be glad that it was made. I think you make some very good points that there is an awful lot to like in John Carter.

It's a pity that the film couldn't find the audience it deserves, and with Disney already admitting defeat and writing it off as a loss, there go any remaining chances at a sequel. Hopefully it will gain traction in the home video market and more people will get a chance to experience it. At the end of the day, I'm just glad that someone spent all that time and money to make a new personal favorite for the few of us that connected with the film.

Oh, I would be remiss if I didn't thank you for 25+ years of enjoyment reading your books and being swept away time and time again. My dad first turned me onto your books when I was a teenager in the 80s and I can't thank you enough for so many wonderful hours spent wrapped up in your stories over the years. Can't wait to share them with my kids!
 

Re: Great post on John Carter
Date: 03/20/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, John--

The film is actually doing fairly well in foreign markets, and that may help supplement the domestic take. But as you say, that is not our concern! We can simply enjoy the effort and artistry placed before us, and be grateful.

My gosh, have I been writing that long?!
 

Re: Great post on John Carter
Date: 03/20/2012
From: John Harwood
Location: Austin, TX

My apologies, didn't mean to date us both... Heck, I came fairly late to the game even, but an off-to-college gift in fall of '87 from my dad of FORGE OF GOD in hardback makes it easy for me to date. Then I found out about EON and BLOOD MUSIC and then ETERNITY came out the next year, and I was pretty good and hooked by that point and you became one of a handful of authors that I'd look up first whenever I hit the bookstore to see if anything new had come out.

Anyway, didn't mean to turn this into a fan letter (I'm sure you'll cope okay), but, well... you rock. 'Tis true.
 

Re: Great post on John Carter
Date: 04/06/2012
From: Doug Dandridge
Location: Tallahassee

Greg. Sorry, but I posted on your face book page and didn't know this page existed. You, as someone who loves the genre, should be the one critiquing movies like John Carter. That reviewer pretended to intellect he didn't possess. As someone trained in psychology, I found it especially humorous his specious use of psychological terminology to describe those of us who love books like A Princess of Mars. He should stick to reviewing chick flicks and buddy movies. Reminded me of the guy who critiqued the movie Thor last year. He loved the parts of the movie where Thor was a normal human acting like a fish out of water (you know, the boring part to those of us who grew up reading the comic). He said he would have enjoyed the movie more if it hadn't degenerated into that silly superhero stuff. The point is the guy didn't have a clue about that genre, and was definitely the wrong choice to critique it.
 

Re: Great post on John Carter
Date: 04/07/2012
From: Greg Bear

But not yet in a rocking chair... Good to hear, John!
 

Re: Great post on John Carter
Date: 04/07/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Doug! I quite liked both aspects of Thor. Movies that can cover all the bases are pretty neat.
 

Re: Great post on John Carter
Date: 04/25/2012
From: Art Behrman
Location: seattle

Kaor!
 

Re: Great post on John Carter
Date: 05/03/2012
From: Greg Bear

And now for a game of Jetan!

Leaving Earth

Date: 03/17/2012 From: Michael Egan
Location: West Yorkshire, GB

Hi Greg.
What do you see as the best strategy for humanity's dispersal across the Solar System? I'm delighted with the amounts of data coming in from the various Mars probes, etc, but shouldn't the asteroids - particularly the near-Earth ones - become our focus? Humanity has gone forth and multiplied, and now there's little room and diminishing resources left on poor old Mother Earth. The NEAs are easier to reach - aren't they...?
 

Re: Leaving Earth
Date: 03/20/2012
From: Greg Bear

Perhaps, but Earth's resources are still abundant enough and cheap enough that mining asteroids is unlikely to be profitable for the immediate future--unless, of course, we find one filled with rare earths. And getting the ore from an asteroid--or even the refined metal--down to the ground would be a formidable challenge, security-wise. One man's treasure becomes another man's weapon of choice!

Have to say that finding a solid gold asteroid would likely deeply upset the gold-standard folks!

MULTIVERSE

Date: 03/08/2012 From: Sean M. Brooks
Location: Lawrence, MA

Dear Mr. Bear:

I'm very pleased you and Mr. Dozois are editing a memorial volume in honor of your late father in law Poul Anderson called MULTIVERSE. And to be released next Fall.

I did wonder why Sandra Miesel was not in the list of contributors. She is well known not only as a writer in her own right but also as a shrewd and perceptive commentator on the works of Poul Anderson. An essay from her for MULTIVERSE would have been natural!

Sincerely, Sean M. Brooks
 

Re: MULTIVERSE
Date: 04/07/2012
From: Greg Bear

She would certainly have contributed critical acumen. But this is a collection of original stories by authors heavily influenced by Poul, set in Poul's universes. As such, I look forward to Ms. Miesel's judgments on how well they've succeeded!
 

Re: MULTIVERSE
Date: 04/07/2012
From: Sean M. Brooks
Location: Lawrence, MA

Dear Mr. Bear:

I agree, once you pointed it out, that MULTIVERSE is meant to be a collection of stories in honor of Poul Anderson by setting them in the universes he created. Not a volume of commentary analyzing the works of your father in law.

All the same, a separate volume devoted solely to commentary on PA's works seems to be a good idea as well. And one in which an essay from Sandra Miesel makes sense. I hope something like that is done in the near future.

Sincerely, Sean M. Brooks

Splendid!

Date: 03/07/2012 From: Jeremy
Location: Missouri

Hello Mr. Bear -
I've been meaning to write you for some time. I just wanted to thank you for writing these stories. We as a community have been chomping at the bit for more background on
Forerunners, let alone Precursors. You've given us a lot to digest, and I for one, cannot wait to read them again.


I hope these stories aren't your only contribution to the Halo universe!

Two side notes:
-In Cryptum, you would split every few chapters with a poem. I absolutely loved these and was hoping to see them in Primordium.
-I was wondering if the events that took place at the end of Glasslands (unknown bodies in cryo pods) was somehow related to these stories.
I had initially hoped one pod might have belonged to Chakas.

I suppose I will have to wait on the third book. :) In the meantime, could you point me to another of your books that you think I might enjoy?
 

Re: Splendid!
Date: 03/20/2012
From: Greg Bear

No spoilers! Thanks, Jeremy... I wonder how many poems most readers could stand?

Other books--the book that apparently encouraged Frank and Kevin to select me for the Forerunner saga was CITY AT THE END OF TIME. And HULL ZERO THREE is doing quite well, my most recent novel before tackling the Forerunners.

Looking for a book...Thought it was yours.

Date: 03/05/2012 From: Dennis Bateman Sr
Location: Colorado

Mr. Bear,
In 1990 I read a book titled "The End". I thought it was your book but I don't seem to find it listed in your titles. It was a book about the end of the world caused by an alien race that bombarded the earth with two meteors, one antimatter. They penetrated the earth and start racing around in the earths core. As the momentum slowed the two meteors got closer eventually meeting each other and exploding the earth.
Does this sound familiar?
The first story line was about a large cinder cone in New Mexico appearing over night and containing a decoy entity that kept the government officials busy with promises of advanced technology until its death because it was not bio engineered with a method of discharging its own waste.

Hopefully you are the Greg Bear that wrote it. If so, can you tell me where I might purchase a copy?

Sincerely yours,
Dennis
 

Re: Looking for a book...Thought it was yours.
Date: 04/07/2012
From: Greg Bear

Plot's correct in every detail, Dennis! But the title of this book was THE FORGE OF GOD. It's available in trade paperback and in e-book.

Style of Primordium

Date: 03/01/2012 From: Mike
Location: Michigan

Hi Mr. Bear,

Just finished Primordium, and off the bat I want to say that there were some parts of it that I sincerely enjoyed.

That being said, I felt like a majority of the book was simply... filler. The first half, the trek through Halo almost seemed as it had been written years before and was simply a stock story that had a few Halo references thrown in when it was decided to become a Halo novel. In contrast, I thought the Lord of Admiral's flash back was one of the most interesting parts of a Halo novel since the Nylund books. The problem was, it was so small in comparison, I felt rather offput.

While I know I, and I'm sure most other people as well, read the Halo books because we love getting back stories, there seemed to be a remarkable lack of action in the vast majority of the book. The pages and pages about them simply walking didn't really serve to enhance the characters or provide all the much useful or interesting information. I honestly felt as though it was simply there to add pages to the book.

Don't get me wrong, the parts involving the Didect and 'The Captive' didn't have a ton of action, but were highly interesting and captivating. But the lack of really even a single battle doesn't really belong in a Halo novel. I'm sure everyone would like to hear much, much more about both the human/forerunner war and the forerunner/flood conflict. Passing references to them (like the extremely brief, almost passing description of humanity's last stand) are less of a tease and more of an annoyance that we don't get to actually know details. In contrast, look at the novelization of The Fall of Reach. That is a truly amazing recollection of that important event. If it had simply been described in 3-4 pages, it wouldn't have had anything close to the enjoyment factor.

I've probably read Fall of Reach, First Strike, and Ghosts of Onyx around 15 times each. It doesn't get boring because it's an engaging tale that manages to tell a great story and keep it interesting. I don't really feel a desire to reread Primordium, I kind of just chugged through it for the information it provided, and was fairly disappointed at that.

Sorry for such a long response, and let me stress that I'm not trying to do a Nylund comparison, but I was wondering if the third book will contain more interesting elements and less 'they were walking... and they had to eat scorpions.... now they're cold... and they found some berries... and now they're walking again... and ooops, it's been 50 pages'. Will we ever get a good description of of some of those ancient battles?
 

Re: Style of Primordium
Date: 04/07/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Mike. Middle novels in trilogies serve as bridges to introduce a lot of salient details that will "explode" in the next novel. Volume Three is pretty dense with the sort of material you seem to like! Looking forward to your reaction when it comes out in January.

Origin of Geshel name

Date: 02/28/2012 From: Jason
Location: NC

Hi,

I was curious what the origin of the name for the Geshels is.


Love the books,

Jason
 

Re: Origin of Geshel name
Date: 04/07/2012
From: Greg Bear

Probably derived from "gesellschaft" in German. Take a look at

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gemeinschaft_and_Gesellschaft

 

Re: Origin of Geshel name
Date: 04/08/2012
From: Roald Laurenson
Location: near western isles

Ich hatte nicht erkennt, aber 'Geshel' war viele genossen.

Enjoyed that word, to save you a trip to the dictionary. Yet unaware of the connection; alternate spelling will do that unless you are in the right mood. And enjoying the way the word comes across each time is not that mood ;).

Your reference is interesting on the distinctions of community and society also - better than average for Wikipedia, and one more insight into what idealism and precision of distinction have meant in last century's history of Europe. You can live there and know about these things, but still not have the fully useful collection of them. Which seems to always grow.

Cheers, Greg, und grss,
Clive
 

Re: Origin of Geshel name
Date: 05/03/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks! Alas, Roald, the web has turned your parting greeting into a sneeze!

William Hope Hodgson

Date: 02/23/2012 From: Sam Gafford
Location: Warren, RI

I recently learned of your affection for the works of William Hope Hodgson! Could you share some of your thoughts about this long neglected writer and his works?
 

Re: William Hope Hodgson
Date: 04/07/2012
From: Greg Bear

Certainly, Sam! Hodgson was one of the extraordinary group of pre-WWI UK visionaries that included George MacDonald, William Morris, and Arthur Machen... and of course H.G. Wells. Hodgson seemed to have been quite influenced by Wells, especially in THE HOUSE OF THE BORDERLAND, but his Celtic genius gave those Wellsian elements a distinctly weird and terrifying touch. Hodgson created a seminal "psychic detective" in Carnacki, similar to Algernon Blackwood's John Silence. And in THE NIGHT LAND, he created one of the most difficult and visionary far-future novels. I suspect (though I haven't confirmed this) that Olaf Stapledon might have read his works, and am also fairly convinced that Hodgson's vision of the Night Land eventually leads to Tolkien's Mordor. But more research needs to be done on those suspicions! Hodgson died at Ypres in WWI. He seems to have prefigured the killing fields of France in THE NIGHT LAND.

The Forge of God

Date: 02/23/2012 From: Stephen Smith
Location: Justin, TX

Hi Greg,
First, let me tell you I have really liked your science fiction. FoG/Anvil stand out in my mind as does the EON series. Those bring me back to time when I was much younger and I read them when they first came out.

Anyway, my question is this. I saw that a couple years ago there was a post about getting FoG/Anvil in audiobook format. Will this ever happen? I guess same question for EON and stuff as well.

As a side note, I just bought he first Halo book last night on the way home from work. I have played Halo of course but I am not so much interested in the shoot'em up aspect as I am a good story which I have heard this is. Thanks for your work.



 

Re: The Forge of God
Date: 04/07/2012
From: Greg Bear

These are coming shortly from Audible, if they aren't already available. Let me know if you can't find them.

Thanks, Stephen!

Thanks for making Halo boring.

Date: 02/22/2012 From: Candice
Location: NSW

If I wanted to read about people walking lots, I'd read Lord of the Rings again.
 

Re: Thanks for making Halo boring.
Date: 02/22/2012
From: Greg Bear

Hello, Candice--

That's an incredible compliment. Thanks for your kind words!
 

Re: Thanks for making Halo boring.
Date: 02/22/2012
From: Joshua Walcott
Location: Danville, VA

That didn't sound like a compliment to me. How about you actually respond to your "fans" you jackwagon. I really hope you don't write anymore books for the Halo universe. You have ruined it enough already.
 

Re: Thanks for making Halo boring.
Date: 02/23/2012
From: Matt
Location: UNSC HQ Sydney Australia

I agree, LotR are the best books for walking action. Greg Bear I read for enigmatic ancient alien races, fantastic superstructures, and compelling characters.
 

Re: Thanks for making Halo boring.
Date: 02/24/2012
From: Bill Goodwin
Location: Los Angeles, CA

Discomfort with circular artifacts is highly indicated.
 

Re: Thanks for making Halo boring.
Date: 04/04/2012
From: Christina
Location: Just outside Seattle

This seems unusually mean spirited to me. Though I can't comment on the content of the book myself, I can attest to the fact that it is evidently quite a page turner. I am an avid reader and book collector, have been all of my life. Living in a family of men - a husband that reads mostly boating magazines, a 14yo that reads only under threat of death, and a 19yo that has read halo, star trek and ww2 fiction very sporadically in the past along with required HS reading, I bought these ebooks for him hoping for the best. I haven't seen him read a book since the end of junior year. He read the first of the two in 24 hours. Doesn't sound boring to me.
 

Re: Thanks for making Halo boring.
Date: 04/07/2012
From: Greg Bear

Excellent! Thanks, Christina. Throw a couple of my other books at them and see if you get the same response! (I'd suggest EON and HULL ZERO THREE.)
 

Re: Thanks for making Halo boring.
Date: 04/14/2012
From: vix
Location: New Zealand

I'm really suprised Halo got a boring vote. I just read Halo the cryptym. i always considered the Halo franchise looked boring in the extreme...some sort of video game...bang bang guns...this book made me want to read more, maybe even... eeek play a game(unlikely).
incidently Christina, EON was my first ever sci fi, and it got me completely hooked on the sci fi genre. its still on my shelf 15 years later and gets re read often. its a favorite!
 

Re: Thanks for making Halo boring.
Date: 04/14/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, vix!
 

Re: Thanks for making Halo boring.
Date: 04/17/2012
From: Trevor
Location: Wisconsin

Loved the first two books and I was on your site looking for when the third is to be coming around when I saw this post. Different style? yes... Boring? absolutely not. I have read the first two books 3 times now along with the first in the Karen Traviss trilogy (as well as all the other Halo novels) simply because I am big into fact checking and cohesive stories. Ladies and Gentlemen, like the books or not, it makes no difference. These books are canonized... They are the official history in the Halo universe... and in all my research and pouring over of these books they all check out perfectly fine. It seems things are lining up very nicely with the release of Halo 4 this coming November. Thank you Greg for taking on this huge task of giving form and meaning the what was once shapeless and hidden. You've done a mighty fine job sir, keep it up!
 

Re: Thanks for making Halo boring.
Date: 04/23/2012
From: Jonathan Williams
Location: Maryland

Joshua,
Regardless of your impression, the LotR books are among the most highly acclaimed fiction books there are. I have to agree -- putting Bear's books on the same shelf is a tremendous compliment, even if it wasn't intended that way.
 

Re: Thanks for making Halo boring.
Date: 05/02/2012
From: Colin Pittman
Location: Atlanta, Georgia

I have to completely disagree with the original poster. Cryptum was fantastic! And, although Primordium was a lot of walking, I really enjoyed the exploration of halo, the character development, and all the mystery! The ending of Primordium defiantly made it all worth it. It BLEW my mind, but raised so many questions as well! Needless to say, i will be buying book 3 for the forerunner saga on day 1. Can't wait! Great work Bear!
 

Re: Thanks for making Halo boring.
Date: 05/03/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Trevor--I've had a lot of terrific help both at Tor and 343. They help keep me in line!
 

Re: Thanks for making Halo boring.
Date: 05/03/2012
From: Greg Bear

I'm currently reading E.R. Eddison's WORM OUROBOUROS. What a strange, rich, and wonderful contrast to Tolkien! But I doubt we'll be able to slip his neo-Jacobean style into a Halo novel. Still, it's tempting...
 

Re: Thanks for making Halo boring.
Date: 05/08/2012
From: Greg Bear

Indeed, a long walk clears the head! Thanks, Colin.
 

Re: Thanks for making Halo boring.
Date: 05/19/2012
From: Ian Dalziel
Location: Christchurch, New Zealad

If we are talking voyage stories, may I recommend David Lindsay's 'A VOYAGE TO ARCTURUS' (1920). Tolkien praised it highly.
 

Re: Thanks for making Halo boring.
Date: 05/22/2012
From: Greg Bear

Excellent suggestion. Loren Eisley also loved it.
 

Re: Thanks for making Halo boring.
Date: 07/30/2012
From: Jake Young
Location: Ohio

Greg you may have wrote some good science fiction works in the past, but you have defiantly dropped the ball with the Halo novels. You shouldn't have accepted a job writing about something that you knew nothing about, and something that means a lot to many people. Just because you have done good in the past does not excuse your present failures. Please may the third book in the series be your last attempt at Halo book, and a decent attempt at that.
 

Re: Thanks for making Halo boring.
Date: 08/25/2012
From: Greg Bear

As teacher, I must ask you to give examples of my failings, and then justify them with quotes from the texts and a poll/survey from Halo critics around the ecumene. (Just kidding, Jake! Glad to have your comment.)

Primordium "typo"?

Date: 02/16/2012 From: Vincent
Location: Austria

Hello, Mr. Bear
I recently read your novel "Halo: Primordium" and stumbled across an irritating line of text:
"We are the Flood. There is no difference. Until all space and time are rolled up and life is crushed in the folds... no end to war, grief, or pain. In a hundred and one thousand centuries...unity again, and wisdom. Until then--sweetness."

The irritating part is "A hundred and one thousand centuries" (=10.100.000 years), irritating, because the events took place approx. 100.000 years before the events in the Halo games, especially the upcoming H4. Can you confirm that this is a mistake and you ment years, instead of centuries?

Thank you for your time,
kind regards,
Vincent

PS - Looking forward to part 3. Your's are the first Halo novels I can't put aside until finished reading!
 

Re: Primordium
Date: 02/22/2012
From: Greg Bear

Absolutely! Good catch, Vincent. We're all smacking our heads on this one. Or... maybe there's something really coming that far down the line?

Maybe for HALO 1000?
 

Re: Primordium
Date: 03/17/2012
From: Sean
Location: Texas

A hundred and one thousand centuries would be:
101,000 x 100 = 10,100,000 years.
But yeah, who knows. We're talking about a being nearly as old as the universe itself. It very well could have been referring to something in the past instead of being able to foresee the future...or FURTHER into the future.
 

Re: Primordium
Date: 04/07/2012
From: Greg Bear

Hmmm... Can I use that as my excuse? Thanks, Sean!

A few questions on Primordium

Date: 02/09/2012 From: Godot
Location: Europe

First off, I want to say I've enjoyed the Forerunner novels so far and I'm looking forward to the concluding book. I've been a fan of your work, as well as Halo, for some time and it is refreshing to see the Halo universe imagined from a completely new perspective.

As you are no doubt aware, your Forerunner novels have sparked an immense amount of questions and speculations among the fan community. I'm under no illusion that you'd be able to answer some of the more significant questions I have (others have already presented some of them on this very board), so I'll just stick to a few which I think are detail-oriented enough not to involve any major story revelations.

Of particular interest to me is the new information regarding the origins of humanity and Earth. If this doesn't involve spoilers from the third book, do the locations of Marontik and Djamonkin Crater have corresponding equivalents in the real world? I noticed Marontik was described as being located in the confluence of two rivers, and ancient Mesopotamia immediately sprung to mind. It could obviously be anywhere else since there's over a 90,000 year gap between the Marontik civilization and the Mesopotamian high cultures known to us, and even Earth geography could've changed in that time (naturally - or through Forerunner intervention?). Still, it would be nice to be able to find the locations on a map.

I also have another question. Reading Primordium, I noticed that the names "hamanush" and "chamanush" seem to have switched places. Whereas in Cryptum "chamanune" and "hamanune" were used to refer to Chakas' and Riser's species, respectively, in Primordium the terms are used the other way around. Was this an intentional change made to correct an error in Cryptum? I can see why the term for the more common variety of human (which Chakas represented) would be a simpler word, or indeed closer to the modern word "human".

I think my third question may be skirting the bounds of spoiler territory, but the revelation that there were actually two Arks was surprising to say the least. I noticed how Cryptum makes no indication of there being two Arks, but the description of the Ark in the concluding chapters of Cryptum seemed decidedly different from the Ark also known as Installation 00, having six "petals" as opposed to eight and being illuminated by a series of plasma tubes instead of an artificial star. So, in light of the new information from Primordium, it seems apparent to me that the Ark in the end of Cryptum was actually the bigger Ark used to manufacture the larger Halo rings; was this meant to be so? Anyway, I'm looking forward to know how the third Forerunner novel or other future fiction will explain the absence of another Ark in the "contemporary" period of Halo fiction, or the smaller Ark's designation as "Installation 00"; it calls into question what happened to the other Ark, which also seems to be outside the installation numbering scheme.
 

Re: A few questions on Primordium
Date: 02/22/2012
From: Greg Bear

All good questions, Godot! All I can say is... more to come. (I'll look up the reversal on hamanush and chamanush...)

Forerunner Saga

Date: 02/06/2012 From: Scott
Location: Dallas, TX

Greg,

First, I think it's awesome that you have a forum where you answer your readers' questions. You're a brave man.

Second, I would like to ask about the Forerunner books and your involvement with 343 Industries. I was curious about your collaboration process and what kind of freedoms you had and if any of your choices will end up having an impact on the franchise going forward, beyond the third book in your Trilogy?

For example, the character of Chakas ends up having a fairly significant evolution of his own. Who was more responsible for bringing that character and his fate into the narrative? Did 343 have plans all along to bring back Spark and give you free reign to weave that together, or had that been a result of your own creative process? I guess really what I'm getting at is will we as gamers find ourselves sometime playing moments in a video game that evolved off of your creative spark, and if so do you foresee a longer term relationship with 343 as they move forward with the Halo universe?

Cryptum and Primordium are awesome, I've really enjoyed them. The tone you've set is exactly what I'd hoped for and I can't wait for the third. Thanks so much for lending your talents to a franchise that a lot of us hold very dear.

Scott
 

Re: Forerunner Saga
Date: 02/22/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Scott. What we've created in these books will definitely play a part in HALO 4. Those who read the books will be well backgrounded on significant details. What I've seen of the game so far looks awesome--and sounds awesome as well!
 

Re: Forerunner Saga
Date: 05/12/2012
From: Denise Wiles
Location: North Carolina

Please tell me when the third book of the Forerunner Saga will be released. I would appreciate it. Both my husband and I love the novels.
 

Re: Forerunner Saga
Date: 05/16/2012
From: Greg Bear

Hello, Denise-- January of 2013!

Forerunner Saga

Date: 02/06/2012 From: Josh
Location: Walcott

Mr. Bear,
I have read both of the Halo novels that have written. While I enjoy some of the mystery involved in the books, I have both novels rather boring. They don't read like previous novels and lacks do not keep me interested. They seem to have a few plot points with a lot of useless filler, especially Primordium. I am hoping that your next novel makes up for the previous two. Thank you for your time and for adding to the Halo universe.

Joshua Walcott
 

Re: Forerunner Saga
Date: 02/22/2012
From: Greg Bear

You're most welcome, Josh. Let me know what you think of the third volume!

Halo, no unanswerable questions!

Date: 02/01/2012 From: Matt
Location: UNSC HQ Sydney Australia

Dear Greg,

I've read Eon and Eternity, and when I heard you were writing books set in the Halo universe my jaw hit the floor.

Recognition of the artistic merits of video-games is something I am passionate about, and having a brilliant author such as yourself lend your considerable talents to the genre really helps support a medium that gets a lot of bad press.

You are an inspiration to my own writing (meager though my efforts have been[although if anyone is interested, check out my website at http://gamerfiction.blogspot.com.au/ ]).

I will finish with some questions, but nothing you need fear Forerunner reprisals over.

1. Would you like to write more novels set in the Halo universe after Forerunner Saga 3?

2. Given the opportunity, would you consider writing a Halo game? Or any game for that matter?

Thank you, for your wonderful work, and for reading this!

Regards,
Matt
 

Re: Halo, no unanswerable questions!
Date: 02/22/2012
From: Greg Bear

It's been terrific fun working with the good folks at 343, as well as interacting with the Halo fans. But the foreseeable future, I'm going to be involved in my own projects. But who knows? This much fun is hard to beat.
 

Re: Halo, no unanswerable questions!
Date: 02/23/2012
From: Matt
Location: UNSC HQ Sydney Australia

As far as I'm concerned, you are welcome back to the Halo universe any time, and I'm looking forward to your future projects.
 

Re: Halo, no unanswerable questions!
Date: 04/07/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Matt!
 

Re: Halo, no unanswerable questions!
Date: 04/21/2012
From: Jason Garwood
Location: Blackpool, UK

I must admit, Greg. Cryptum and Primordium are by FAR the best written Halo novels. They don't just feel like cheap tie-in novels, they have a life of their own and really speak volumes about the deep Halo universe. I would love your involvement in future Halo titles whether it be writing new books or even just consulting other authors, or consulting the writers of the games.

- Jason
 

Re: Halo, no unanswerable questions!
Date: 05/03/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Jason!

An Evening to Honor Gene Wolfe

Date: 01/30/2012 From: Valya Dudycz Lupescu
Location: Chicago, IL

Dear Mr. Bear:

On March 17, 2012, the Chicago Literary Hall of Fame will honor Gene Wolfe with the first Fuller Award, awarded to a Chicago author who has made an outstanding lifetime contribution to literature. We're planning a wonderful event at the fantastic Sanfilippo Estate in Barrington Hills.

Peter Sagal, host of NPR's "Wait, Wait, Don't Tell Me!" is our Toastmaster for dinner. Our Master of Ceremonies will be Gary K. Wolfe, and we've assembled quite a list of Special Guests: Neil Gaiman, Peter Straub, Michael Dirda, Michael Swanwick, Patrick O'Leary, Audrey Niffenegger, Luis Urrea, and more.

As part of the celebration, we are going to have a Commemorative Program that includes messages of congratulations or shared memories from Gene's friends and contemporaries. I would like to invite you to submit a short message for Gene that will be posted in the Program, to be handed out at the event.

If you'd like to write a message, I will need to have that text by February 15th. I can also send you a program after the event, if you'd like.

In case you'd like to learn more about the event, we have a website: http://chicagoliteraryhof.wordpress.com/

Feel free to contact me with any questions, and if you have any ideas about other people who might like to publish some congratulatory words for Gene, please let me know or feel free to forward my email address to them.

Thank you for your attention.

All the best.
Valya Dudycz Lupescu
The Chicago Literary Hall of Fame
 

Re: An Evening to Honor Gene Wolfe
Date: 01/30/2012
From: Greg Bear

Sounds terrific, Valya!

"Gene Wolfe has challenged, amused, and elegantly entertained us with a dizzying variety of excellent stories and novels. Here's my all-too-brief note of thanks for the years of exhilirating fun! And many more to come!"

Greg Bear

Loved Halo Cryptum

Date: 01/29/2012 From: Andrew
Location: Germany

Dear Greg,

As a fan of science fiction, and Halo being my favorite of all, I loved your book Halo Cryptum. I felt you really captured a unique angle on the Halo universe, and your style of narrative was gripping until the end. Looking forward to reading the next one! Keep it coming! :)

Best,

Andrew
 

Re: Loved Halo Cryptum
Date: 01/30/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Andrew! Work in progress...

Halo, mostly

Date: 01/28/2012 From: Dartanian McLevish
Location: San Antonio, Texas

Mr. Bear,
Let me start by saying I very much enjoyed the first two books in the Forerunner Saga and I hope to be reading more of your works in the future.
Now, I have a few questions. First: is there an ETA on the third Forerunner book? I understand you probably get that question at least twice a day, but I haven't found any information on this and I desperately want to know. Second: are you working with 343 Industries as you write these? It seemed there were problems with the writers and Bungie because there were discrepancies between the book and the games. Minor most of the time, but they were still there and I think it would be unfortunate if you wrote the fantastic lore you did and it was ignored by 343. Third:... well, I'd rather not spoil the emd of Primordium for people who haven't read it, so scratch the third question. I look forward to the possibility of hearing from you in the future Mr. Bear.
-Dartanian
 

Re: Halo, mostly
Date: 01/30/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Dartanian! Forerunner #3 is in progress right now! Early 2013 is the target pub date.
 

Re: Halo, mostly
Date: 01/30/2012
From: Daranian McLevish
Location: San Antonio, Texas

I eagerly await early 2013 then. Thank you for your time
 

Re: Halo, mostly
Date: 03/17/2012
From: Sean
Location: Texas

Alot of the discrepancies from the books were involving firepower calcs( the ".4 tenths" speed of light bit from Fall of Reach for the Super MAC cannons is a big one...)
Past that, I think the universe has been relatively consistent.
Hopefully Mr.Bear keeps of the great work and doing an excellent job at making the Forerunners the ultra-powerful civilization we envision them to be and the Flood as deadly and virulent as we can imagine.
Cheers.

Thank you

Date: 01/26/2012 From: Matt White
Location: Youngtown, Arizona

Sorry, I may have sent an accidental blank message before this one. I very much enjoy your style of writing in the Forerunner saga. I am an avid Halo fan who reads all the novels and collects much of the art, including figurines. I also have Forerunner inspired tattoos. I'm glad to say that i will be ordering a few of your books to hold me over until the yet to be titled third book in the Forerunner saga will be released. Thank you for keeping me reading, which seems to be a fading pass time among my peers. Any chance you will be in Arizona in the future? I'd love to get a book or two signed. Thanks again.
 

Re: Thank you
Date: 01/30/2012
From: Greg Bear

Good to hear you'll be trying a few of the others, Matt. Always warms my heart to have a new reader!

City at the End of Time

Date: 01/26/2012 From: Adam Browne
Location: Australia

Just to say I made a false start on this book a while ago - judged it harshly because of the term 'Keeper'; thought it was high fantasy, sprinkled with - but jeez, it's WONDERFUL - the writing is so deft, how lightly you weave, for instance, the Victorian London backstory into Glaucouse's current doings - really, really mature and literary and non-show-offy writing. (It refers, doesn't it, to that crazy early 20th Century book set at the end of time? the love story, with the pathetic fallacy all over the place - objects with emotions etc etc? - can't remember what it's called...)

Delightedly,

Adam Browne
 

Re: City at the End of Time
Date: 01/30/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Adam! My chief influences here were CITY AND THE STARS by Clarke and THE NIGHT LAND by Hodgson. But there's a tip of the hat to a lot of British visionaries over the past few centuries.
 

Re: City at the End of Time
Date: 05/08/2012
From: Carl Rosenberg
Location: Vancouver, BC

Any guesses as to why so much science fiction envisioning the far future is by British writers--Wells, Stapledon, Hodgson, Clarke, Aldiss, etc.? Not that other writers don't write about this as well (such as works by you and other authors of the stories collected in the anthology Far Futures, edited by Gregory Benford), but it nevertheless seems to be a British tradition.
 

Re: City at the End of Time
Date: 05/08/2012
From: Greg Bear

Good question! In the English language, likely it's the influence of both Wells and Stapledon. They cast a pretty long shadow over UK intellects and writers through the 1940s. U.S. writers touch often enough on the long future, but with a different approach, certainly different from Stapledon. Still, the community of writers using English is difficult to break down into this or that tradition. The cross pollination is strong.

PDF Books

Date: 01/25/2012 From: Bobby G. Bristoe
Location: Ellettsville Indiana USA

Dear Mr. Bear
I am a great fan of yours and own the entire Eon series. My question is in regards to PDFs that are available on the internet. I came across all the books I own and one I do not own. Here is my question. I downloaded the books I own and the one I am purchasing, but then got into a moral dilemma. My thinking was that if I own the book, then it should be okay to have the PDF as well, but the more I thought about it, the more I wasnt sure. I am a Christian and I also believe if you have to justify something, then maybe you should take a step back and really look at the situation, because 9 time out of ten, if you do have to justify, you are probably wrong. I did some research on the internet and cannot get a clear answer to my question of ethics and law. So my next step is to be on the safe side. I am asking permission to either keep, or remit to you a fair price for the intellectual property, or if you would like, for me to delete the files.

I do not believe anything is worth going to hell for. If I didnt care, I wouldnt write this letter. I have stored the PDFs for now awaiting your answer. If you ever decides to make your books available in this format, I will be first in line to purchase the files. I have already purchased files from Bob Mayer, the Area51 series and the Atlantis series, all in PDF format.

One other note before I go. I found a web sight at www.ebooooks.com that calls themselves the Online Ebook store. Several of your books are for sale on this site in PDF format. I was about to purchase these books from this site but something smacked wrong about the site. I did some investigation and found out that the register of the site has hidden his information and is located in Sweden. He makes absolutely no mention of copyright law on the site and in fact avoids all mention of copyright. I do not think the site is legitimate, and therefore decided to not make the purchases from them. I do believe they are not only pirating but making a massive profit from it too.

For your consideration, I Thank You,
Bobby G. Bristoe
 

Re: PDF Books
Date: 01/30/2012
From: Greg Bear

I doubt any of us will end up damned because of downloading copyrighted material. But there's a special place in purgatory for those who profit off the labor of others. They'll be forced to write novels--and then have them pirated by demons and reviewed by Trolls! And I hear the beer in the pubs is flat. But at least there's beer, so there's that.
 

Re: PDF Books
Date: 01/30/2012
From: Bill Goodwin
Location: Los Angeles, CA

Possibly we are to be dammed for copyrighting. "La propri←t←, c'est le vol!"

And beer? "Abandon hops all ye who enter here."
 

Re: PDF Books
Date: 01/30/2012
From: Bobby G. Bristoe
Location: Ellettsville Indiana USA

Thank you Mr. Bear. I about died laughing at your response, You are not the only author I have written, but the responses are about the same. I really enjoy your work and will be BUYING more books in the near future. Hopefully you will make some of your work available in different e-reading formats. As I said before, I'll be in line to purchase those too. Thank you again for your reply.
 

Re: PDF Books
Date: 01/30/2012
From: Greg Bear

Ah, the angels invisibly copy everything without permission! Which means there's a hell of a library out there waiting for those of us who play by the rules, such as they are.
 

Re: PDF Books
Date: 01/30/2012
From: Greg Bear

I should have said, "for those who profit off the labor of others and don't give them a fair cut..."

Otherwise, publishers and agents would be crowding into the pub along with pirates.

And there's worshipping false gods or creating false religions, such as Kopimism. Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle know where THAT takes you.
 

Re: PDF Books
Date: 01/30/2012
From: Bobby G. Bristoe
Location: Ellettsville Indiana USA

Funny, I heard from Larry Niven yesterday. now that is spooky.
 

Re: PDF Books
Date: 01/30/2012
From: Bobby G. Bristoe
Location: Ellettsville Indiana USA

Mr Bear, I just looked up Kopimism. (on comes the light bulb) Now I under stand why ebooooks.com is in Sweden. I'm really glad for that bad nagging feeling now, and glad they didn't get my credit card too. Think I'll just stick with Amazon and the author's sites from now on. Disaster averted.

Writing dialog

Date: 01/24/2012 From: Kelly Marsh
Location: Camano Island

Or rather punctuating and arranging it so it flows properly. Some authors do this quite well, others do not.

I find writing what the characters say to be relatively easy, compared to the above mentioned hurdles, and there seem to be many ways to approach it.

For example:

"That is a beautiful color for a car, I have always loved that shade of blue," said Jack admiringly. "Yes, I really like the way it looks, especially at this time of day," Bob replied.

Or: "That is a beautiful color for a car," Jack said admiringly, "I have always loved that shade of blue." "Yes, I really like the way it looks," Bob replied, "Especially at this time of day."

Then there are some authors who often don't bother to attribute the dialog to anyone; we readers are just supposed to know who is speaking from context and the order of sentences.

Jack, after looking admiringly at Bob's new vehicle said "That is a beautiful color for a car, I have always loved that shade of blue."

"Yes, I really like the way it looks, especially at this time of day."

"Be honest, did you buy it just for the color?"

"No, it's a great car, the color is just a bonus."

"Yeah, sure."

"No, really, it is."

And so on.

I don't really mind the latter, unless it runs on too long, and I lose track of who is speaking. Admittedly, this may have something to do with me getting older...

So, here is my question: Greg, does this sort of thing come naturally to you, or is it something you have to think about, write, rewrite, and so on? Either way, is this something regarding which you can give any helpful hints? For me your dialog always flows well; I never end up saying to myself "What? Wait a minute..." and going back to re-read in order to get a clear idea of what just happened, where I sometimes do with other writers. This, by the way, is something I find to be particularly annoying; it breaks the spell, and takes me out of the story.

Any pearls of wisdom you might impart will be most welcome.

By the way, when I was growing up a bit west of you in Edmonds, it was spelled "dialogue." :)




 

Re: Writing dialog
Date: 01/30/2012
From: Greg Bear

I like to think of varying styles as equivalent to varying meter and pitch in a song. James Ellroy or Jim Thompson will write a scene with dialog very differently than, say, Thomas Pynchon or Gene Wolfe. And different styles often point to the demands of prior markets and groups of readers--hard-boiled mysteries vs Henry James, to draw extremes! How would Henry James write this dialog? Raymond Chandler? Charles Dickens? (Scrooge is hauled far into the future...)
 

Re: Writing dialog
Date: 01/30/2012
From: Roald Laurenson
Location: Islands in view

Ah, yes. Raymond Chandler. Whom I have recently discovered -- what treasure, and not the least bit only for his dialogue(s).

Cheers, Greg. I keep up, even when relatively silent, and am always interested, you can bet. Wishing that you are having fun.

Clive
 

Re: Writing dialog
Date: 01/31/2012
From: Greg Bear

"Fun? Cracking wise now, are we?"

I twisted my lips and stared hard at the palooka. He did not look like the kind of guy who could ever have fun. I was being provacative, silly me. Soon enough, those big ham fists would come up and mash me in the jaw. Soon enough was too soon. I might lose the two or three teeth that were still mine, along with all those on loan from my orthodontist.

I turned as slowly as I dared and walked away on little cat feet. My neck muscles twisted like dyspeptic snakes.

"Huh! Fun!" the palooka coughed. His arms swished the empty air and his sausage fingers made little tapping motions. "This world ain't made for fun. Writing's hard work! And don't you forget it!"

I left him to stew, and what a savory stew it would be.

(Top that, Chuck Lorre!)
 

Re: Writing dialog
Date: 02/01/2012
From: Roald Laurenson
Location: Islands in view

His call after me apparently turned my steps, until I wasn't facing the door any more.

"Yeah, well, we get a lot of that from youse snipes...but let me tell you something."

"Ok, I'm listening."

"You see, me and the boys kind of favor brother Ray. Even if he does get a little pungent with us once in a while."

He fingered the chrysanthemum in his lapel, whose crisp red brightness wasn't doing any more than the tight hard weave of his expensive plaid sports jacket, to take the blur and dirt out of the room, or cloak his soft but massive aspect.

"Somebody has to be the one to educate his pal, once in a while, or maybe a little worse, to give that snoop his story. But what he never does is leave any of the rest of us only carrying a spear. You get what I'm saying?"

"Yeah," I said.

"It's like that speculative guy, I forget his name, and the lady with the sharp coat and complicated manners, on that generation ship which seems to have taken off without any morals aboard. Kind of like Kafka, that one -- you surprised I would know that?"

I let him roam.

"And that Jones in another place, full of cops worse than here. Like a voice out of an open pipe, and I can't get it out of my head, nor forget the poor guy."

"You see, you can't tell me that writer fellow didn't have his fun with these friends, nor in hearing them talk himself, on the page. It ain't all frustrations, is it...and on that, I'm really letting you go. Just this time."
 

Re: Writing dialog
Date: 02/19/2012
From: Kelly Marsh
Location: Camano Island

Is that dialog, or narrative?
 

Re: Writing dialog
Date: 02/22/2012
From: Greg Bear

We're heading right into a theme song!
 

Re: Writing dialog
Date: 02/22/2012
From: Greg Bear

Both! Playwrights and screenwriters get pure dialog, once they hide the stage instructions. The directors get to block and choreograph. Prose writers have to dance and talk at the same time!
 

Re: Writing dialog
Date: 02/23/2012
From: Roald Laurenson
Location: wayward isles

"We're heading right into a theme song!"

Haha.

Yes.

and Yes to the other observation, as well ;)

Hull Zero Three audiobook track info

Date: 01/24/2012 From: Michael
Location: Indiana

Is there any way to get accurate track information for the Unabridged Audiobook? I'm listening to my copy in iTunes but the track info that it has downloaded from the internet is all kinds of messed up. Disc 1 and Disc 2 have the same track titles yet the audio is actually different. It shows the Artist as LIsa Kieypas as well. I don't have a way to submit the correct info since I don't know what that is beyond the first track.

Thanks

 

Re: Hull Zero Three audiobook track info
Date: 01/30/2012
From: Greg Bear

Wish I could help, Michael--I'll pass along this info to the folks who may know.

Halo: Cryptum

Date: 01/22/2012 From: Josh DeJonghe
Location: Quad Cities, IL

Hello Mr. Bear. I would just like to say thank you for writing the Forerunner Saga! You are a great writer. Before I read the first book of this saga, I wasn't a die hard Halo fan. I played the video games and all, but never got much into it. This book, however, changed me. It is a very fascinating book and I just completed it. I will be reading the next one right away since this story has captured my attention so much. This is by far the best science fiction book I have ever read and one of the best books in general I have ever read. The amazing details you put into it gives me a great image of what everything looks like. It is like watching a movie. The story also is very intriguing. Just one question though: Do you think that this saga is a good place to begin the Halo series or would you think it would be better to go back when the Precursors were still around? That, of course, is a long time ago, but is there a story that could be told which would be the true, true, beginning of Halo? Just wanted to get your input on that. Thanks, again, for such a riveting masterpiece.
 

Re: Halo: Cryptum
Date: 01/30/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Josh--

More about the Precursors! I agree. Working on vol # 3 right now.

Primordium

Date: 01/20/2012 From: Caleb Henry
Location: United States

Hello Mr. Bear,

I just want to say that I am really enjoying The Forerunner Saga. Before picking it up, I actually preferred leaving the forerunners as a big mystery, but my expectations were blown out of the water with Cryptum, and I just finished Primordial as well!

My one request however, is that the name Christ not be used in a vulgar fashion, as it is with the modern humans who are "interrogating" Spark.

Thanks a ton for reading this, and I'm looking forward to the final book!
 

Re: Primordium
Date: 01/20/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Caleb! I truly appreciate the feeling, but do not always control my characters and their language. It is odd, however, that in present standards for broadcast language, and in long-standing editing in fiction, blasphemy is tolerated while sexual slang is not. But 'twas ever the case. Nobody seems to object now to the term "bloody," but that was once about as bad as it could get.
 

Re: Primordium
Date: 01/21/2012
From: Bill Goodwin
Location: Los Angeles, CA

I'm reminded of Heston's "Damn you all to hell" line in Planet of the Apes. There was serious concern in 1968 on the part of the producers. Heston defended the line, saying "He's not swearing, he's literally calling upon his maker to damn them!"

Naturally, what a fictional character says is illustrative of the charcter, not the author or how he believes his readers should behave. Seeing language mistreated can remind us to respect it more, yes? The crucifixion itself was pretty vulgar, but it seems to have increased many people's faith, not led them astray....
 

Re: Primordium
Date: 01/24/2012
From: Kelly Marsh
Location: Camano Island

Actually, Greg, in the UK "Bloody" is still considered blasphemous by many of the older folks, even though you will hear people use the word in many BBC broadcasts. So while less people squawk about it these days, I think it is only because they have given up.

For a parallel, go to the Alderwood Mall, and surreptitiously sidle up to a group of kids. Be appropriately shocked by their language, which in most cases would have made a sailor blush back in the forties. Then, think about how you might get them to be a little more polite. :)
 

Re: Primordium
Date: 01/30/2012
From: Greg Bear

It's hard to know when a sailor is blushing--they get a lot of sun! Back before the 1960s, writers and movie/TV scripters had to rely on euphemisms, except for Hemingway, who got away with a couple of good ones in the 1940s. The last refuge of this sort of euphemism is TV, though I swear I once heard "fuckwit" used by Lenny Briscoe on LAW AND ORDER. Unbleeped!
 

Re: Primordium
Date: 01/30/2012
From: Caleb Henry
Location: United States

@ Bill: that's really interesting! It is true [especially in a universe as big as halo] that the statements characters make can be more the character than the solo author of the work, but that character is merely the compilation of multiple "authors," or "influencers" with only one holding the pen. Therefore it is not fair to pass off the behavior of a fictional character like it was uncontrollable.
Seeing language mistreated can make us respect it more yes, but that misses the whole picture. There are zillions of examples of poor language. I personally would rather be influenced by better examples, which are hard to find. I really love halo, which is not that bad with their diction; something for which I am truly grateful. Still it would bring me greater peace of mind to not see Christ misused.

@ Kelly: I did not know that was still considered blasphemous in the UK, albeit that term is not really used much in the States, so it is considerably less controversial here. Nonetheless I agree with your point. Thanks.

@ Greg Thanks again for getting back to me, and being in touch with your fan base. I understand that some things are beyond your control, but I hope that you will consider keeping this one word from being used in a derogatory manner. I'm sure that as the "primary author" you have a good deal of clout over the work done with the Forerunner trilogy.
 

Re: Primordium
Date: 01/31/2012
From: Greg
Location: Texas, United States

I believe that's a really unfair request. As no censorship should ever be placed on an author, or anyone, for that matter. I applaud his freedom to treat these characters like actual individuals.
 

Re: Primordium
Date: 01/31/2012
From: Greg Bear

I also appreciate the devotion behind the sentiment. I suspect we are forgiven, but we should ever bear in mind the possible offense.

Hull Zero Three - How Far?

Date: 01/20/2012 From: Dave Cappuccio
Location: Connecticut

Hi Greg (or whoever).

Huge fan (since The Stone). I just finished Hull Three Zero and was a bit perplexed on timelines. Early in the story Ship was designed to eventually attain a speed of 0.2C, or essentially a light year every 5 years . Halfway through it was revealed that they were 434 light years from earth, which I figured equated to about 2,170 years if travel, but towards the end the group "discovered" they'd been out about 500 years. So either they traveled only 100 light years, or were going about 0.9c, or I'm just showing my age :-). Can you help?

Dave
 

Re: Hull Zero Three - How Far?
Date: 01/20/2012
From: Greg Bear

Sounds like either my characters are a little confused, or we didn't properly work out the timeline!

Your book saved my fathers life!

Date: 01/18/2012 From: Dylan Daywitt
Location: Alpine, Tx

Hello, my name is Dylan Daywitt I recently purchased a so called "signed" copy of halo primordium from amazon.com. Thow I am not sure if it was a fake or not I am writing to tell you how your book potentialy saved my fathers life. On January 15 my father, brother, sister and I were on our way out of town to eat dinner with a friend when my father lost controle of the viehicle and we flipped twice into the ditch, my sister and I were not injured, my brother recieved a few major lacerations on his left arm but my father was severely injured including a broken neck, back, upper left arm, and both bones I his lower arm were broken. He is stable and recovering, but before we crashed I was reading halo primordium I distinctly remember I was on page 106. When we wrecked my head was down reading my book and after the accident there was a large DVD player by my feet (it had been thrown from the back of the viehicle) I quickly called 911 to assist my brother and father. But if I had not been reading I would have taken the full impact of that DVD player to the back of my head and would have Been incapacitated. Sadly the book was destroyed I the Accident and is barley readable. But had I been knocked out I'm affraid my father would have blead out on that long Texas road. If you contact me at my email address I can send you pictures of the accident and destroyed book.

Reguards,
Dylan
 

Re: Your book saved my fathers life!
Date: 01/20/2012
From: Greg Bear

Amazing story, and harrowing indeed, Dylan. Very glad to hear you're all on the mend. I now wonder if my advice as a parent to my own kids when we traveled by car--to put aside their books, games, etc., and look at the country going by--was the correct approach!
 

Re: Your book saved my fathers life!
Date: 01/31/2012
From: sharon
Location: lubbock

Dylan,
I visited your dad when he was at UMC. (I had the big yellow lab therapy dog.)We came back the following week, but he had already been moved! I wanted to write your mom and pass along a card from another homeschooling mom.
Can you send me your address?
Best Wishes,
Sharon
 

Re: Your book saved my fathers life!
Date: 01/31/2012
From: Greg Bear

Best to send actual addresses by direct email. Hope everybody gets back in touch!
 

Re: Your book saved my fathers life!
Date: 02/01/2012
From: Dylan Daywitt
Location: Lubbock, Tx

Thank you Shanon we received your card and who would have thought you would find me on here! Also Mr. Bear I just purchased a new copy of Primordium and have continued my story! My father is doing great and should be in rehab in the next week! I can't wait to finish and will be readily awaiting the next book!
 

Re: Your book saved my fathers life!
Date: 02/22/2012
From: Greg Bear

Good to hear! Thanks, Dylan, and more power to all of you.

Book Signings?

Date: 01/18/2012 From: William Austin Chinnery
Location: Kansas City, Missouri

Dear Greg,

I am William Chinnery from Kansas City, Missouri. I really enjoyed reading Halo: Cryptum and Halo: Primordium. So far in my point of view you are really experianced in your knowledge of the Halo Universe. I think so far that the two books I've read so far from you, that you're my favorite Sci-fi writer. I was wondering, if at any time, you could visit Kansas City, Missouri for Book signings? Thank you for your time

William A. Chinnery
 

Re: Book Signings?
Date: 01/20/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, William! I'd love to, but no trips are scheduled for the time being. Still, you can buy signed copies from a number of outlets, including the University Book Store in Seattle.

Halo Primordium

Date: 01/17/2012 From: Lee Cruise
Location: Virginia

I just finished your book and I thought it was very interesting especially the end. I have a few questions though that I would like answered. I was kind of confused on the Captive being a gravemind and a precursor at the same time, the way I saw it he was a gravemind but he was in the form of a "precursor". So my question is were the precursor's always Flood or was the captive in particular a gravemind taking the form of a precursor? If this is the case does that mean that once the flood is big or smart enough they can take the shape of what ever they chose? That was the first question and I hope I worded it ok, my second is that Guilty Spark was destroyed in Halo 3, and I understand in the book the AI was both Chakas and Guilty spark. I want to know if Chakas was able to split himself into exact replicas of himself or where the fractions of him and if so were they different personalities or where they simply fractions of the whole? Also when he took control of the ship he seemed more like Guilty Spark and when he was telling the story he seemed like Chakas, is this from multiple personalities or is it simply he was planning to do what he did all along. My final question is when Chakas said he served his enemnies and they became his only friends was he refering to the Forerunners?
 

Re: Halo Primordium
Date: 01/20/2012
From: Greg Bear

Alas, some of my previous answers have elicited the appearance of a phalanx of heavily armored Forerunner Warrior-Servants. Too much has been revealed already!

Thanks!

Date: 01/16/2012 From: Gil Artman
Location: Bayide, NY

Thanks you, Greg, for the courtesy of your response, which appears to admonish me, in kindly and humorous fashion (I hope), to think for myself...so I'll try to bend my brain around the question... best wishes to you and yours for this new year, 2012! Gil
 

Re: Thanks!
Date: 01/20/2012
From: Greg Bear

No admonishment necessary--it's what all my readers do instinctively, right?

Darwin's Radio and recommendations

Date: 01/16/2012 From: Katie
Location: Harrisburg

Hi Greg-

I just wanted to let you know how much I love your work. You do such an amazing job of spanning the different topics of true "science" fiction. Coming from a physics undergrad background and as a current biomedical researcher/grad student, I love the diversity. However, I especially love all of your biological sci-fi because 1.)there aren't many authors out there that can write an in-depth extrapolation of the possibilities that biology and science gives and 2.)in my opinion, you are the best among those that can.

Thus, I have to ask if you have anymore of this type of book in the pipeline. Blood Music and the two Darwin books are personal favorites of mine. I too would love another sequel to Darwin's.

Also, I was wondering if you could recommend any other authors in that particular genre. I would say that some Michael Crichton books qualify, but I haven't found many other authors that truly take the real science into account. I was just wondering if you had any authors that you liked or that inspire you in the "biological extrapolation" field, as your site puts it.

Thanks for the great books! Please keep them coming.

Sincerely-
-Katie

 

Re: Darwin's Radio and recommendations
Date: 01/20/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Katie! I do have a fondness for biological sf--in fact, wrote a piece on it for James Gunn's Encylopedia of Science Fiction some years back. Currently, the field is rich with possibilities, too many for me to list without leaving out good names! Let me know whom you find and favor, and we'll pass along your recommendations.
 

Re: Darwin's Radio and recommendations
Date: 02/05/2012
From: Greg Stewart
Location: Columbus, MS

Mr. Bear,

You were way too modest in your reply. You should have also mentioned your stories:

Vitals

Quantico, Mariposa, Queen of Angels, Slant, and Heads (from the loose series that ends with Moving Mars)

Legacy from your Eon / Eternity series

Which all are great reads and have strong bio-themes or bio-aspects to their stories.

Greg in Mississippi
 

Re: Darwin's Radio and recommendations
Date: 02/22/2012
From: Greg Bear

I blush! But it's always good to have someone else toot the horn.

Where to buy your books

Date: 01/16/2012 From: Michael Finch
Location: Warwickshire, England

Hello,

I'm looking to buy HALO: PRIMORDIUM on a MP3 download but as alwys with TOR books i'm struggling to find where i can buy it.

I'm on the road a lot and don't get much chance to read books so the Audiobook is perfect resource for me.
I really enjoyed HALO: Cryptum.
I am a Audible member and it's not available for download with them.
Any help would be appreciated

Regards,
 

Re: Where to buy your books
Date: 04/07/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Michael. Still haven't got an answer back from Tor about the availability. I'll keep trying.

Halo: Primordium

Date: 01/14/2012 From: Andrew Plebanek
Location: Racine, WI

Dear Mr. Bear-

I haven't had a chance to read your second Forerunner Saga book yet, but I plan to purchase it as soon as it pops up in my local bookstore

That being said, I have read about several elements of the story second-hand through Halopedia ( I spend a lot of my spare time editing on the site), and I was wondering if you could clarify a few things... I've regrettably already spoiler'd myself, so rest assured you won't be ruining the story for me : )

1. Is the Precursor first encountered on Charum Hakkor a Precursor in its normal state, a single Flood-infected Precursor, or a Gravemind made up of many corpses? Also, when it says that the Flood and Precursors are the same, does it mean that they are literally the same species, or that all Precursors were infected?

2. Exactly how many Halo Rings are there? I got the impression that the original twelve were separate from the six that were at Installation 00 in the first book.

Thanks in advance!
-Andrew
 

Re: Halo: Primordium
Date: 01/20/2012
From: Greg Bear

There are indeed a few more details in the actual book. Hope you get back to us after closer study. Thanks, Andrew!

Halo Primordium questions

Date: 01/14/2012 From: Joey
Location: United States

Hello, Greg Bear, its Joey. I just want to say Primordium was awesome! It was just as great as Cryptum, with more surprises and excitement. I can't wait for the third book and how Halo 4 connects with these books. I just had two questions about Primordium:

1. On page 339, the Didact is said to have six fingers on his hands. Is this from his mutation or do all Forerunners have six-fingered hands?

2. Will we ever see Mara again? I was surprised that my favorite species of apes, Gigantopithecus, appeared in an installment from my all-time favorite story. But I wonder where she went.

Thanks. :)
 

Re: Halo Primordium questions
Date: 01/20/2012
From: Greg Bear

I do believe Mara is in the personal care of the Lifeshaper... But who can say how that will turn out? Thanks, Joey!

Greg, Have you had the opportunity to read Peter Watt's "Blindsight"?

Date: 01/10/2012 From: John S
Location: Western MA

I thought it was brilliant. I have been keeping my fingers crossed that you would expand on your Forge of God/Anvil of Stars Duology...and was thinking that Watt's recent "First Contact" novel might give you some motivation/inspiration to tell you next story in the Killers/Benefactors universe. As I have mentioned before, FOG and AOS are two of my favorite hard Sci-Fi novels of all time...and I (and thousands of other fans) want to know more of the fate and (hopefully) further adventures of the Martin, Hans, and all of the Dawn Treader children (as well as the Brothers) :)

Anyways, just wondering if you did happen to read "Blindsight", because I thought it was an original take on First Contact, Von Neuman probes, and especially the deeper, philosophical questions of intelligence, mind and consciousness. Especially the ultimate question Watt's poses regarding the evolutionary advantage (or disadvantage, as the case may be) of being both self-aware and intelligent.

Cheers, Greg. Can't wait for your next Sci-Fi endeavor(s). Just finished Hull Zero Three, and was blown away!
 

Re: Greg, Have you had the opportunity to read Peter Watt's
Date: 01/20/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, John! Have yet to read BLINDSIGHT but will definitely pick it up soon.

Third Novel of the Forerunner Saga

Date: 01/10/2012 From: Anthony Feiner
Location: Virginia

Hello Greg,

Just wanted to start of by saying I love your work on the Forerunner saga!

With that, I was wondering if you know (or can guess) if the final novel of the series will be released before the release of Halo 4. I know you just finished Primordium and maybe haven't even started on the final novel, but I was just wondering since the last two novels came out in January.
 

Re: Third Novel of the Forerunner Saga
Date: 01/20/2012
From: Greg Bear

We're aiming Forerunner 3 for early 2013.

Cryptum and Primordium

Date: 01/07/2012 From: Dave Evans
Location:

Dear Greg,

After reading through both Halo Cryptum and Halo Primordium I must say that you have done an amazing job bringing the nostalgic mystery the original Halo had to books. I am greatly enjoying the story of Bornsteller and the Didact and I was in awe at Chakas' revelation at the end of Primordium.

Probably the thing that has me exited most is your telling of the Timeless One. I am looking forward to reading more in the next book you release which I am hoping will be soon. I'm sure it will be before Halo 4 but still.

Thank you for the brilliant story!

Dave
 

Re: Cryptum and Primordium
Date: 01/20/2012
From: Greg Bear

Many thanks, Dave. Working madly toward an early 2013 pub date for Forerunner number 3...

RE: Primordium

Date: 01/06/2012 From: Chris
Location: Boston, MA

Hi Greg,

I'm a huge fan of your work with the Halo novels. It's fascinating to see sci fi tackle (in part) issues of speciesism, and question humanity's role as dominators of life when we could be stewards of it. You made Cryptum a brilliant exploration and treated the characters with dignity, something many parts of the series (especially Reach, which didn't seem to be even remotely bothered to respect the canon) have failed to do.

I have a few questions about Primordium. Obviously this should lead those who have not read it to infer that this message will contain spoilers, so I hope they'll reconsider reading this as opposed to retaliating with complaints.

The first, of course, is what device the humans were using to access Chakas' memories? 343 was destroyed; does every monitor have multiple bodies or vessels? And, is in every monitor the soul, or collected souls, of a pre-cataclysm human being?

How do the Terminal dialogue's fit into this story? If Mendicant was deactivated now, how will he and Offensive Bias fight while the Didact races to fire the arrays?

I'm also having a hard time comprehending Chakas' speech's transition to that of 343 Guilty Sparks. Is that the effect of time and the events at the end of Primordium? Also confusing is his appraisal of the Forerunners in those book compared to his comments of them in the games.

The Forerunner were very obviously noble; while aware of species differences they put a hierarchical ideology of speciesism aside to protect as much life as possible, and yet Chakas describes them as monsters. Is this just his old prejudice? No doubt humans are in a huge way socialized into bigotry (most so much they can kill and eat others based on differences in intelligence), so it's not surprising that in the Halo universe ancient ones would be as well.

Also on this topic, it seems that the Didact is going to be the enemy in Halo 4, and I'm confused about how this is possible, unless he has gone insane, which (I hope) is too formulaic for the Halo series.

And to get the Precursors role straight: they created humans and Forerunners, or they created one species that evolved into two, so that they could use them as subjects in experiments with the Flood? And then the Forerunners rebelled once they'd become aware of their test subject status and overthrew the Precursors, the remaining members fleeing beyond their reach. And then the surviving Precursors sent vessels containing the Flood from outside the rim of the galaxy to be discovered by the first empire of humans as described in Cryptum?

I hope you choose to answer these questions, as I'm deeply interested and found the areas I'm inquiring about too vague to feel confident in my inferences. I also hope that you give as much thought and care to the end of the trilogy as you have to the beginning and middle, and would love to see more exploration of the Mantle, and the Forerunner's contemplations of how advanced civilizations should behave.

Best regards,
Chris
 

Re: RE: Primordium
Date: 01/20/2012
From: Greg Bear

Thanks, Chris! All good questions, and if I answered any of them at this point, I'd likely be tazed! More to come in Forerunner number three, in progress.
 

Re: RE: Primordium
Date: 01/31/2012
From: Matt
Location: UNSC HQ Sydney Australia

The Forerunner Saga humans, both de-evolved and space-faring are far from bigots.

The de-evolved human species are a multi-species society, and Chakas and co. happily accept different races of human and giant gorillas into their merry band.

Space-faring humans had an interstellar empire that embraced alien species like the San-Shyuum.

The true bigots are the Forerunners, which is why they are described as monsters. The Forerunner take it upon themselves to categorize and 'preserve' the life in our galaxy with no acknowledgement of the rights or ideologies of the 'preserved' species.

They are essentially domesticating life in the Milky Way, shaping it into their own ideals of how the universe should be instead of allowing civilisations to forge their own path.

The Forerunners obliterated an advanced interstellar civilisation because it encroached on their territory for reasons the Forerunners dismissed as irrelevant, and this arrogance led to their downfall.
 

Re: RE: Primordium
Date: 02/22/2012
From: Greg Bear

Interesting points, but more is to be revealed in Vol 3! And remember that humans were pretty rough on many civilizations as well.
 

Re: RE: Primordium
Date: 02/22/2012
From: Chris
Location: Boston, MA

The humans seem to be more like a multi-breed society than species, or multi-race may be more accurate. I did not say the different races did not tolerate each other, but they slaughter other species wantonly, which is why the Forerunners devolved them. This is why the Didact described them as "among the most contentious, bigoted, self-centered..." beings. And the fact that they accept them into their "merry band", which they join after having been taken from a primitive life and had their entire paradigms shattered, and while they're trying to survive on a Halo run by a rampant AI and an ancient gravemind, forced to depend on other species' (an example of superordinate goals, which drastically reduce out-group prejudice and discrimination) seems to be an exception, rather than a rule.

Their empire used the San-Shyuum, it didn't embrace them. They were a convenient ally to try to take control of the galaxy.

The Forerunner's Mantle inherently recognizes the value of all life, which is why they seek to protect it. If they were bigots they wouldn't have cataloged as many species as possible to preserve them from the Halo effect, or even have built the Halos, ready to sacrifice themselves to protect sentience in the first place. They would have fought for themselves and let everyone else die. The Librarian's work wasn't like owning a zoo where they have a bunch of species on display to children to marvel at and mock. She saw the end of the Forerunner empire and actively utilized resources to selflessly protect as many other species as possible.

And they do, in fact, let species forge their own paths. This is why Bornstellar comments that "it is not a kindness to diminish competition, predation-even war....but...an imbalance of forces can retard growth and reduce the flow of Living Time." Unfortunately humans tried to forge a path of conquest and immature domination, killing others to save themselves.

Awareness of this fact is why the Didact feels so much regret for devastating humanity; even in light of all of our flaws, he recognized that we were fighting two wars. That is not dismissing it as irrelevant. If you saw a group killing your neighbors to take their homes, or killing you family to take their homes, would you do what you could to stop them or consider their motives and let them continue, even if you knew that they were stealing homes because THEIR homes had been stolen? I presume you would intervene. Would you feel bigoted for or unjustified in doing so?

You seem very triggered by my comments. I wasn't trying to insult you, who I didn't know existed before your response, and hope you don't feel that was the case. Rather I was simply trying to acquire knowledge about my favorite sci fi universe, and a pair of books I've read so many times that I can quote them, a sentiment I'm sure you feel as well. I'm looking forward to hearing your, and Mr. Bear's, thoughts.
 

Re: RE: Primordium
Date: 04/07/2012
From: Greg Bear

I think it's a very complex issue, and it's not going to get any simpler in Vol. 3. The discussion here is first-rate! Looking forward to all of your responses when this final book is published.
 

Re: RE: Primordium
Date: 04/11/2012
From: Alberto
Location: Tx

Chris,

I would like to add to this and I will try to make it as simple as possible because I know that it is complicated.
Humans (both ancient and de-evolved) Yes, they were space faring

 

Re: RE: Primordium
Date: 05/03/2012
From: Matt
Location: UNSC HQ Sydney Australia

Oh, I have no illusions on the damages that humanity inflicts upon other species Greg :-)

I just see the Forerunners as the unjustified aggressors in the conflict. Surely it was within the Forerunner's capabilities and best interests to investigate WHY humanity was encroaching upon their territories, and then to deal with the cause instead of the effects.

This Forerunner hubris directly resulted in the destruction of their entire civilisation.

It is important to remember that not only is the Mantle a philosophical ideal rather than a physical law of nature, it is also a secondhand remnant of the philosophy and civilisation of the Precursors.

Your original question about the origins of the Forerunners and humanity at the hands of the Precursors got my creative juices flowing and I wrote up a large speculative history based upon my knowledge of the Halo universe which can be found here: http://assembly.forwarduntodawn.com/index.php?topic=129.0

I encourage anyone who is interested to read it, and post their thoughts. (Especially you Greg, but then who as an aspiring writer WOULDN'T want to attract your attention?)

The Didact, and his opinion on humanity was clearly not shared by Forerunner civilisation as a whole.

I think one of the most brilliant parts of the Halo franchise is that the different species all have different philosophies and motivations without being caricature or stereotype.

All species in Halo have been shown as 'speciesist' except one. The warm friendly embrace of Flood tendrils. And even they can't absorb the Lekgolo into their collective!

 

Re: RE: Primordium
Date: 05/08/2012
From: Greg Bear

A lot of surprises yet to come... Thanks, Matt!

Question about Forerunner Saga

Date: 01/05/2012 From: Richard McGeary
Location: Johnstown,PA

Mr.Bear,
I have become a huge fan of your Halo Books entitled the Forerunner Saga. I've read both of the books that have been published. The most recent one,(Part 2 of the Forerunner Saga) was a book that a coulndn't put down. I had it read in 7 hours and now i'm wanting more. I know you just finished this one but will the next one be out soon. I actually look forward to the books more than the actual game itself. I hope you keep writing more Halo Books and I think i'm gonna look into your other ones as well. Thank you for the great work that you done in expanding the Halo Universe and I can't wait to see what's next.
Godspeed,
Richard E. McGeary
 

Re: Question about Forerunner Saga
Date: 01/20/2012
From: Greg Bear

Many thanks, Richard! Working on Forerunner Number 3 right now--title yet to be determined.